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a resurrection day for buried hatchets. It sounded a lusty, resonant, and loud call “to arms," and from every ingleside-highland and lowland-it summoned the hostile clans to battle.

But the governorship offered a prize not less tempting than the toga, nor was the popular interest felt in this race any less general. Four candidates entered the field. These were: Judge Nat E. Harris, of Bibb; Hon. Wm. J. Harris, of Polk; Dr. L. G. Hardman, of Jackson; and Hon. J. Randolph Anderson, of Chatham. Judge Harris was

veteran jurist, clean, upright, fearless, eloquent, long experienced in the public councils. He had served in both of the legislative branches, had fathered the bill creating the Georgia School of Technology and had been a most conspicuous champion of the educational interests of the state. As a campaigner, Judge Harris was a revelation. He proved to be a power on the stump. Despite his years, he was fully equal to the demands of a strenuous campaign, and in every part of the state spoke with thrilling effect to great crowds. He possessed the spellbinder's magic.

Mr. Harris, of Polk, was a much younger man. But he had successfully managed the Wilson campaign and had rendered his party a distinct service as chairman of the State Democratic Executive Committee. His skill as an organizer was further shown by the manner in which he had practically remodeled the census bureau in Washington. Appointed director of the federal census by Pres. Woodrow Wilson, he had already within a few short months made a record for himself in this department, but importuned by his friends to make the race for governor, Mr. Harris resigned the office in Washington and returned to Georgia. A son-in-law of the late Gen. Joseph Wheeler, he found a loyal following among the old soldiers. But Mr. Harris eventually retired from the race, preferring to return to the census bureau than to be a party to any further widening of the breach in Georgia politics. He was afterwards promoted by his chief to a still more exalted seat on the Federal Board of Trade.

Doctor Hardman was a successful man of affairs. His home town of Commerce was largely a monument to his enterprise, sagacity and thrift. Widely known throughout Georgia because of his zealous championship of prohibition in the Senate of 1907, he was recognized as the author of the statute prohibiting the manufacture and sale of intoxicants in Georgia. He was also respected for his exalted Christian character, for his wideawake public spirit, and for his generous gifts to worthy enterprises. The monument to Dr. Crawford W. Long, in the Town of Jefferson, commemorating the discovery of anesthesia by this renowned Georgian, was built largely through the patriotic liberality of Doctor Hardman.

Mr. Anderson was an experienced legislator. He had presided with great dignity over the state Senate and had stamped his impress upon legislation. A lineal descendant of Thomas Jefferson, be derived not only his political principles but his ancestral lineage from the fountain springs of democracy, and he bore himself on all occasions with a charm of modesty, in many respects suggestive of the beloved sage of Monticello. But Mr. Anderson was handicapped by the fact that he hạiled

Vol. II-35

from Savannah, a city justly famed for its culture, for its hospitality, for its memories, for its part in shaping the early history of the state; but a city on the remote seaboard, a city differing from all other communities in Georgia in that it was populated directly from England, and a city which, with the trend of population northward, toward the foothills, had not produced a governor since the days of George M. Troup, the undaunted Hercules of state rights.

CHAPTER XXXIII

THE STATE DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY OF AUGUST 20, 1914–SENATOR SMITH

DEFEATS EX-GOVERNOR BROWN FOR THE LONG TERM SENATORSHIPGOVERNOR SLATON LEADS FOR THE SHORT TERM SENATORSHIP-CONGRESSMAN HARDWICK Is SECOND IN THE RACE, FORMER ATTORNEYGENERAL FELDER, THIRD, AND Hon. G. R. HUTCHINS, FOURTH-THE CONTEST UNDECIDED—IN THE GOVERNOR'S RACE, JUDGE NAT E. HARRIS IS SUCCESSFUL OVER DR. L. G. HARDMAN AND Hon. J. RANDOLPH ANDERSON—CLIFFORD WALKER DEFEATS WARREN GRICE FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL-JUDGE N. R. BROYLES IS NOMINATED FOR THE APPEALS BENCH OVER Two STRONG COMPETITORS-SUPERIOR COURT JUDGESELEVEN MEMBERS OF CONGRESS RENOMINATED—THE STATE DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION BEGINS IN MACON A TURBULENT SESSIONFAMILIES DIVIDED ON THE ISSUES OF THIS CAMPAIGN-ILLUSTRATED BY THE POTTLES-SENATOR SMITH, THOUGH Not A DELEGATE, APPEARS IN PERSON UPON THE SCENE—Is CRITICISED FOR USING THE STEAM-ROLLER—LEAVES MACON AT MIDNIGHT-DRAMATIC SCENESA DEADLOCK ENSUES OVER THE SHORT TERM SENATORSHIP-AN ALL Night SESSION—THIRTEEN BALLOTS TAKEN WITHOUT RESULT—THE CONVENTION TAKES A RECESS OF FIVE HOURS FOR REST—ON REASSEMBLING, MR. FELDER IS GIVEN THE FLOOR—IN A GRACEFUL SPEECH, HE WITHDRAWS-GREAT EXCITEMENT FOLLOWS—THE FRIENDS OF GOVERNOR SLATON DEMAND A HEARING FOR HIM BEFORE THE CONVENTION—This Is ACCORDED THE GOVERNOR MAKES A STRONG APPEAL FOR SUPPORT ON THE BASIS OF His PLURALITY VOTE—BUT THE FELDER DELEGATES BREAK TO HARDWICK, WHO, ON THE FOURTEENTH BALLOT, IS CHOSEN UNITED STATES SENATOR-RESIGNS His SEAT IN CONGRESS-MR. HARDWICK Is SUCCEEDED BY HON. CARL VINSONCHARGES AGAINST JUDGE EMORY SPEER INVESTIGATED BY A COMMITTEE OF CONGRESS—Ex-PARTE PROCEEDINGS—EVIDENCE Not SUFFICIENT TO CONVICT-JUDGE SPEER IS EXONERATED—BUT A NEW JUDGESHIP IS CREATED IN THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT, TO WHICH HON. W. W. LAMBDIN IS APPOINTED_PROSPERITY REGISTERS HIGH-WATER MARK DURING THE SECOND YEAR OF GOVERNOR SLATON'S ADMINISTRATION -ON THE EVE OF THE EUROPEAN WAR.

It is needless to revive on this page the asperities of a campaign in which no vital issues divided the people of Georgia. The contest consisted mainly in a choice between candidates, all of whom were able, high-minded, upright and patriotic, and it was fortunate for the state that she was so rich in men of this character, .so well equipped in every way to serve her in the national councils. The state democratic primary occurred on August 20, 1914. United States Senator Hoke Smith carried the state by a decisive majority for the long term senatorship, receiving 120,355 votes against 61,644 for ex-Governor Brown.* But for the short term senatorship the result was a deadlock. Governor Slaton led the ticket with 61,857 votes, securing also a plurality of counties and of county units in the state convention. Mr. Hardwick came second, his popular support aggregating 55,469 votes; Mr. Felder third with 30,820 votes; Mr. Hutchins fourth with 21,654 votes; and Mr. Cooper fifth, with 9,675 votes. The last named candidate, Mr. Cooper, though given a flattering support, did not succeed in obtaining any county units, for which reason his following was unrepresented in the convention at Macon where the contest was finally settled.

In the race for governor, Judge Harris received 78,830 votes and carried enough county units to give him a clear majority over both of his opponents. His campaign manager, St. Elmo Massengale, Esq., was complimented upon his splendid work. Doctor Hardman ran second, with 64,955 votes and Mr. Anderson third with 36,784 votes. Doctor Hardman's race was a revelation. As the campaign progressed, he developed a strength which surprised even his best friends and had the campaign been of longer duration he would doubtless have been elected governor.

Attorney-General Warren Grice lost in the primary election to Hon. Clifford Walker, of Walton, a young man of brilliant talents, who · obtained an early start in the race and conducted a quiet but vigorous campaign. Judge Nash R. Broyles defeated two strong candidates for Judge Roan's vacant seat on the Court of Appeals. bench, viz., Hon. William H. Terrell and Hon. Alexander W. Stephens, the latter a grandnephew of the Great Commoner. For railroad commissioner, Hon. Paul B. Trammell was renominated, defeating Hon. S. G. McLendon. For commissioner of agriculture, Hon. J. D. Price defeated Hon. J. J. Brown. For state treasurer, Hon. Wm. J. Speer, the incumbent, defeated Hon. L. M. Park, the latter a brother of the late Treasurer Robert E. Park. Comptroller-General William A. Wright and Prison Commissioner E. L. Rainey also defeated strong opponents. The other state house officers were renominated without opposition,

Superior Court judges—in half the circuits—for the ensuing two years were named as follows: Hon. Wm. D. Ellis and Hon. George L. Bell, Atlanta Circuit; Hon. Walter W. Sheppard, Atlantic Circuit; Hon. Henry C. Hammond, Augusta Circuit; Hon. H. L. Patterson, Blue Ridge Circuit; Hon. J. P. Highsmith, Brunswick Circuit; Hon. J. L. Kent, Dublin Circuit; Hon. H. A. Mathews, Macon Circuit; Hon. R. N. Hardeman, Middle Circuit; Hon. J. B. Jones, Northeastern Circuit; Hon. J. B. Park, Ocmulgee Circuit; Hon. W. C. Worrill, Pataula Circuit; Hon. Moses Wright, Rome Circuit; Hon. W. E. Thomas, Southern Circuit; Hon. C. S. Reid, Stone Mountain Circuit; Hon. A. L. Bartlett, Tallapoosa Circuit; Hon. B. F. Walker, Toombs Circuit; Hon. J. I. Summerall, Waycross Circuit; and Hon. Chas. H. Brand, Western Circuit.

Under temporary appointment, Hon. W. W. Lawson for a few months served as judge of the Dublin Circuit, succeeding Hon. K. J.

• Files of the Atlanta Constitution, August 21, 1914.

Hawkins, deceased; and to succeed Judge T. A. Parker, resigned, Hon. J. W. Quincy for a short while served as judge of the Waycross Circuit.

Two other vacancies occurred on the Superior Court bench during Governor Slaton's administration. Judge Robert T. Daniel of the Flint Circuit and Judge C. S. Reid, of the Stone Mountain Circuit, both died in 1915; and to fill these vacancies Governor Slaton appointed Hon. H. E. W. Searcy, of Griffin, judge of the Flint Circuit andHon. Chas. Whiteford Smith, of Atlanta, judge of the Stone Mountain Circuit.

There were a number of contests this year for seats in Congress; but the incumbents were all successful. Judge W. C. Adamson, in the fourth district, was returned over Hon. W. C. Wright, of Newnan, a former chairman of the State Democratic Executive Committee; Hon. Thomas M. Bell, in the Ninth, defeated Hon. W. A. Charters, of Gainesville, a fellow-townsman; Hon. J. Randall Walker, in the Eleventh, defeated Hon. J. J. A. Henderson; and Congressman Dudley M. Hughes, in the Twelfth, defeated Judge W. M. Clements, of Eastman. From the Tenth District, Hon. Carl Vinson was chosen to succeed Congressman Thomas W. Hardwick, the latter having entered the race for United States senator. There were no contests in the other districts.

On September 1, 1914, the State Democratic Convention assembled in Macon and was called to order by United States Senator William S. West, who had recently succeeded Hon. Wm. J. Harris, resigned, as chairman of the State Democratic Committee.* This was Senator West's last appearance in public. Hon. W. F. Jenkins, of Putnam, presided during the convention's temporary organization, and Judge E. J. Reagan, of Henry, was made its permanent chairman. St. Elmo Massengale, who had managed the Harris campaign for governor with such marked success, was called to the secretary's desk.

To illustrate how the issues of this campaign even divided families, there were two brothers, Joe and Bob Pottle, both of whom were prominent delegates to this convention. Judge Bob Pottle was a recognized leader of the Brown faction and its candidate for temporary chairman. Hon. Joe Pottle was identified with the opposite faction and made a speech nominating for the short term senatorship, Hon. Thomas W. Hardwick, who was Senator Smith's choice of candidates.

Great enthusiasm prevailed among the delegates constituting the Smith faction, due to the preponderating numbers of this contingent in the convention hall and to the presence in Macon of Hon. Hoke Smith, whose powerful personality dominated the politics of the state in this delirious hour of excitement. Mr. Smith was harshly censured for his appearance in person upon the scene of hostilities, when the issue involved in his own election had already been settled ; and not a few of his warmest supporters joined in these criticisms. It was charged that his purpose was to play the part of Juggernaut, in running the steamroller over his adversaries and to crush the senatorial aspirations of Governor Slaton, preferably by forcing Mr. Hardwick's nomination, or if necessary, the nomination of former Attorney-General Felder. Mr. Smith justified his engagement of hotel quarters in Macon at this time by reminding his critics that he was a candidate before the convention for United States senator. Though not a delegate, he was represented

* Files of the Macon Telegraph, September 2, 1914.

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