The Ladies' Book of Etiquette, and Manual of Politeness: A Complete Handbook for the Use of the Lady in Polite Society ...

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Lee & Shepard, 1872 - Etiquette - 340 pages

The Ladies' Book of Etiquette, And Manual of Politeness: A Complete Handbook for the Use of the by Florence Hartley, first published in 1872, is a rare manuscript, the original residing in one of the great libraries of the world. This book is a reproduction of that original, which has been scanned and cleaned by state-of-the-art publishing tools for better readability and enhanced appreciation.

Restoration Editors' mission is to bring long out of print manuscripts back to life. Some smudges, annotations or unclear text may still exist, due to permanent damage to the original work. We believe the literary significance of the text justifies offering this reproduction, allowing a new generation to appreciate it.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - tavisharts - LibraryThing

Not as funny as the gentleman's guide to etiquette. I did nearly die of laughter when the book had to make a special point not to suck on the end of your parasol while strolling down the street ... Read full review

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Women don't have rights. Back then we didn't have to worry about women Talking back since they had to listen to us privileged white males. Now when we look at the content in the book it is old fashioned but that is the best part about it but since it talks about women to much 1 star. Now one last thing to add Trump is da best.  

Contents

I
11
II
21
III
34
IV
40
V
44
VI
54
VIII
60
X
66
XIX
116
XX
142
XXI
154
XXII
158
XXIII
166
XXIV
172
XXV
178
XXVI
232

XII
76
XIII
81
XIV
87
XV
97
XVII
105
XVIII
109
XXVII
244
XXVIII
259
XXIX
264
XXX
283
XXXI
303

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Page 296 - There is such a rush of all other kinds of words in our days, that it seems desirable to give kind words a chance among them. There are vain words, and idle words, and hasty words, and spiteful words, and silly words, and empty words, and profane words, and boisterous words, and warlike words.
Page 296 - ... words, and silly words, and empty words, and profane words, and boisterous words, and warlike words. Kind words also produce their own image on men's souls, and a beautiful image it is. They smooth, and quiet, and comfort the hearer.
Page 292 - Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them, in a great measure, the laws depend. The law touches us but here and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform, insensible operation, like that of the air we breathe in.
Page 12 - This would make them consider, whether what they speak be worth hearing ; whether there be either wit or sense in what they are about to say ; and, whether it be' adapted to the time when, the place where, and the person to whom, it is spoken.
Page 296 - Cold words freeze people, and hot words scorch them, and bitter words make them bitter, and wrathful words make them wrathful.
Page 327 - Silks intended for dress should not be kept long in the house before they are made up, as lying in the folds will have a tendency to impair its durability, by causing it to cut or split, particularly if the silk has been thickened by gum.
Page 300 - A wellregulated mind can find time to attend to all. When a girl is nine or ten years old, she should be accustomed to take some regular share in household duties, and to feel responsible for the manner in which her part is...
Page 272 - The warm, tepid, cold, or shower bath, as a means of preserving health, ought to be in as common use as a change of apparel, for it is equally a measure of necessary cleanliness.
Page 289 - It is not, therefore, the use of the innocent amusements of life which is dangerous, but the abuse of them ; — it is not when they are occasionally, but when they are constantly pursued ; when the love of amusement degenerates into a passion, and when, from being an occasional indulgence, it becomes an habitual desire.
Page 274 - The rule is, therefore, not to dress in an invariable way in all cases, but to put on clothing in kind and quantity sufficient in the individual case to protect the body effectually from an abiding sensation of cold, however slight.

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