Reinforced Plastics Handbook

Front Cover
In this 3rd Edition of the Reinforced Plastics Handbook the authors have continued the approach of the late John Murphy, author of the first and second editions.The book provides a compendium of information on every aspect of materials, processes, designs and construction.Fiber-reinforced plastics are a class of materials in which the basic properties of plastics are given mechanical reinforcement by the addition of fibrous materials. The wide choice of plastics resin matrices and the correspondingly wide choice of reinforcing materials mean that the permutations are virtually unlimited. But the optimum properties of resin and reinforcement cannot be obtained unless there is an effective bond between the two, and this is the continuing objective of reinforced plastics production, design and processing.

· New 3rd edition of this comprehensive practical manual
· This is a 'bible' for all those involved in the reinforced plastics industry, whether manufacturers, specifiers, designers or end-users.
· Has been completely revised and updated to reflect all the latest developments in the industry
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Introduction
1
Chapter 2 Reinforcements
24
Chapter 3 Plastics
109
Chapter 4 Compound Constructions
212
Chapter 5 Fabricating Processes
254
Chapter 6 MarketsProducts
483
Chapter 7 Designs
613
Chapter 8 Engineering Analysis
765
Chapter 9 Selecting Plastic and Process
817
Chapter 10 Summary
997
Chapter 11 Conversions
1035
Bibliography
1043
Index
1051
Copyright

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Page 42 - ... glass — an inorganic product of fusion that has cooled to a rigid condition without crystallizing.
Page 63 - ... fillers comprised of ground rocks or natural or refined minerals. Some fillers, so-called commodity minerals, are relatively inexpensive and are used mostly as extenders. A good example of these is ground limestone. Other fillers, socalled specialty minerals, are usually reinforcing fillers. These are inherently small particle size fillers, such as talc, and surface chemically modified fillers. See also Organic Filler.

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