Witchcraft and Society in England and America, 1550-1750

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Marion Gibson
Bloomsbury USA Academic, Oct 12, 2006 - History - 284 pages
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A unique collection of materials, including works of literature as well as historical documents, Witchcraft and Society in England and America, 1550-1750 provides a broad view of how witches and magicians were represented in print and manuscript over three centuries. It combines newly annotated selections from famous texts, such as Macbeth, Doctor Faustus, and The Faerie Queene with unjustly obscure ones: portrayals of witchcraft and magic from private papers, court records, and little-known works of fiction. In this rich, broad context, Marion Gibson presents the voices of witches, accusers, ministers, physicians, poets, dramatists, magistrates, and witchfinders from both sides of the Atlantic. Each text is introduced with a short essay and fully annotated to explain unfamiliar words and concepts, give biographical details of participants and/or authors, and explore the context in which the text was produced.

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About the author (2006)

Margaret Gibson received instant acclaim on the publication of her award-winning first collection of short stories, "The Butterfly Ward" (1976). One of the stories from the collection, “ Making It, ” was made into the now-classic movie "Outrageous," starring Craig Russell; another, “ Ada, ” was made into a CBC-TV movie, directed by Claude Jutra. This was followed by two highly praised collections, "Considering Her Condition" (1978) and "Sweet Poison" (1993). The story of her own custody battle for her son was made into the TV movie “ For the Love of Aaron.” Her most recent short story collection is "The Fear Room" (1996). "Opium Dreams," her first novel, won the Chapters/Books in Canada First Novel Award in 1998.
Margaret Gibson died in Toronto in February 2006.

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