appleton's new practical cyclopedia

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Page 112 - No Freeman shall be taken, or imprisoned, or be disseised of his Freehold, or Liberties, or free Customs, or be outlawed, or exiled, or any otherwise destroyed; nor will we pass upon him, nor condemn him, but by lawful Judgment of his Peers, or by the Law of the Land. We will sell to no man, we will not deny or defer to any man either Justice or Right.
Page 79 - THE LOGARITHM: of a number is the exponent of the power to which it is necessary to raise a fixed number, to produce the given number. The fixed number is called the base of the system.
Page 90 - The Lord's Prayer, for a succession of solemn thoughts, for fixing the attention upon a few great points, for suitableness to every condition, for sufficiency, for conciseness without obscurity, for the weight and real importance of its petitions, is without an equal or a rival.
Page 107 - Fingal, an Ancient Epic Poem, In Six Books : Together with several other Poems, composed by Ossian the Son of Fingal. Translated from the Galic Language, By James Macpherson.
Page 204 - We believe that the first principles and ordinances of the Gospel are: first, Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ; second, Repentance; third, Baptism by immersion for the remission of sins; fourth, Laying on of hands for the gift of the Holy Ghost.
Page 190 - ... that these coins do not differ from the standard fineness and weight by a greater quantity than is allowed by law, the trial shall be considered and reported as satisfactory...
Page 190 - I have greater witness than that of John : for the works which the Father hath given me to finish, the same works that I do, bear witness of me that the Father hath sent me.
Page 79 - The logarithm of a quotient is equal to the logarithm of the dividend minus the logarithm of the divisor.
Page 183 - For convenience all minerals are referred to a scale of hardness of ten units, composed of common or well known minerals, which are as follows: (1) talc; (2) gypsum; (3) calcite; (4) fluorite; (5) apatite; (6) orthoclase; (7) quartz; (8) topaz; (9) sapphire; and (10) diamond.
Page 79 - The logarithm of the product of any number of factors is equal to the sum of the logarithms of the factors.

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