Fifty More Fables of La Fontaine

Front Cover
University of Illinois Press, 1998 - Literary Criticism - 166 pages
No less a poet than the great
Seamus Heaney said of Norman Shapiro's Fifty Fables of La Fontaine,
"It is a pleasure to open a book as sure and sly as these translations.
. . . He gets the tune right and the tone right, and manages to echo both
the folk wisdom and the poker-faced formality of the originals."
As surely as La Fontaine followed
Aesop, Shapiro has now made fabulous fifty more fables of the wonderful
La Fontaine--among them "The Hare and the Tortoise," "The
Old Man and the Ass," and "The Frogs Who Asked for a King."
David Schorr has just as captivatingly illustrated them.
 

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Contents

III
2
IV
3
V
6
VI
7
VII
8
VIII
9
IX
12
X
13
LIII
68
LIV
69
LV
70
LVI
71
LVII
74
LVIII
75
LIX
78
LX
79

XI
16
XII
17
XIII
18
XIV
19
XV
20
XVI
21
XVII
22
XVIII
23
XIX
26
XX
27
XXI
28
XXII
29
XXIII
30
XXIV
31
XXV
34
XXVI
35
XXVII
36
XXVIII
37
XXIX
38
XXX
39
XXXI
40
XXXII
41
XXXIII
42
XXXIV
43
XXXV
44
XXXVI
45
XXXVII
46
XXXVIII
47
XXXIX
48
XL
49
XLI
50
XLII
51
XLIII
54
XLIV
55
XLV
56
XLVI
57
XLVII
60
XLVIII
61
XLIX
62
L
63
LI
64
LII
65
LXI
80
LXII
81
LXIII
84
LXIV
85
LXV
88
LXVI
89
LXVII
90
LXVIII
91
LXIX
94
LXX
95
LXXI
98
LXXII
99
LXXIII
102
LXXIV
103
LXXV
104
LXXVI
105
LXXVII
108
LXXVIII
109
LXXIX
112
LXXX
113
LXXXI
118
LXXXII
119
LXXXIII
120
LXXXIV
121
LXXXV
122
LXXXVI
123
LXXXVII
126
LXXXVIII
127
LXXXIX
128
XC
129
XCI
130
XCII
131
XCIII
134
XCIV
135
XCV
136
XCVI
137
XCVII
140
XCVIII
141
XCIX
144
C
145
CI
157
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About the author (1998)

Although he had a degree to practice law, La Fontaine does not seem to have done so but, rather, spent his life in Paris dependent on aristocratic patrons. His principal contribution to literature was his 12 books of Fables, to which he devoted 30 years of his life. They were published from 1668 to 1694 and are universally appreciated in France by children and adults alike. In drawing on a tradition of the fable going back to Aesop, La Fontaine created a portrait of human life and French society through the representations of animals. His work is marked by great insight into human moral character, while it preaches the value of the middle road.

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