Amateur Cultivator's Guide to the Flower and Kitchen Gardens: Containing a Descriptive List of Two Thousand Varieties of Flower and Vegetable Seeds; Also a List of French Hybrid Gladiolus Raised and Imported by

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Page 96 - To this add, in the middle of each of the six parts, a broad stripe of light satin-yellow, loosing itself gradually in the ivory skin. Place the flower in a situation where side-light is cut off", and no direct light can reach it except from above, when the stripes acquire the appearance of gentle streamlets of Australian gold, and the reader who has not seen it, may form some feeble notion of what it is.
Page 44 - ... for cut trees are as essential to the geometric style, as having the ground cut or shaped into artificial surfaces. For the mode of cutting trees and shrubs into regular shapes, see TOPIARY; and, for laying out the beds so as to form a regular figure, see PARTERRE. GERA'NIUM.
Page 104 - For early use, sowings are sometimes made in November ; but the general practice is to sow the seed in April, as soon as the frost is out of the ground, or as soon as the soil can be worked. For use in autumn, the seed should be sown about the middle or 20th of May ; and, for the winter supply, from the first to the middle of June.
Page 115 - The plants are always propagated from seeds. Early in April sow in a hot-bed, in shallow drills six inches apart, and transplant to the open ground when summer weather has commenced. The plants should be set in warm, mellow soil, in rows sixteen inches apart, and about the same distance apart in the rows ; or, in ordinary seasons, the following simple method may be adopted for a small garden, and will afford an abundant supply of peppers for family use : When all danger from frost is past, and the...
Page 136 - A new and very large and beautiful variety of the violet ; with single flowers of the deepest blue, and possessing unusual vigor and hardiness ; the leaves are large, and the flowers are borne on very long footstalks (five to six inches in length), and are nearly twice as large and much sweeter than the old Russian violet. It is so hardy that it commences blooming in September, and continues flowering until May, even during the frost and under the snow . . .50 j NOVELTIES AND SPECIALTIES FOR 1869.
Page 147 - If ever a flower merited the name of glorious it is this, which stands far above all other lilies, whether we regard its size, its sweetness, or its exquisite arrangement of color. Imagine upon the end of a purple stem no thicker than a ramrod, and not above two feet high, a saucer-shaped flower at least...
Page 120 - ... removing, them to a shady place, all the summer giving them abundance of water. Each young tree will, or ought to be, twelve to eighteen inches in height by the end of summer, and its stem as thick as a quill, and well ripened. About the end of October these seedlings may be planted out in the garden, in rows three feet apart, and eighteen inches apart in the rows, with labels to each sort ; and in the following April, if there is a wish to bring them rapidly into bearing, each young seedling...
Page 107 - ... earth that you put up be finely broken, and not at all cloddy. While you do this, keep the stalks of the outside leaves close up to prevent the earth from getting between the stems of the outside leaves and the inner...
Page 6 - ... should be watered with a fine rose, immediately after which sow the seed carefully without any covering of soil ; the pots should then be placed in a close frame or a hand-glass in a shady part of the garden (no artificial heat is required) ; in large establishments, of course, they may have propagating or other houses that will do, where the same kind of moist temperature would be obtained ; any sun-light must be carefully guarded against by mats or paper; if the situation is of the proper temperature...
Page 113 - ... the market. CULTURE. — The seeds are sown thinly, on dry, warm soil, in shallow drills two feet apart, about the same time as the Lima Bean. Cover the seeds lightly. Sometimes they come up and are cut off with the frost ; if so, plant again. An ounce of seed will supply any family. After the plants are up, thin them out to nine inches apart ; hoe freely, and draw a little earth to the stems as they continue to grow. They will reach the height of five feet in good soil. The pods must be gathered...

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