In the Company of Men: Representations of Male-male Sexuality in Meiji Literature

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Stanford University Press, 2006 - Literary Criticism - 282 pages
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In the Company of Men examines representations of male-male sexuality in literature from the Meiji period (1868-1912), the era when Japan embarked on an unprecedented modernization campaign. Because male-male sexuality occupied a prominent place in the literary culture of the preceding Edo period (1600-1868), the issue was of importance to Meiji writers and intellectuals, especially given the stigma attached to male-male sexuality in Europe and America, the ?civilized societies that Japan strove to emulate as it modernized. The heterosexualization of literature thus emerged as a key component of the production of Japanese literary and cultural modernity. At the same time, male-male sexuality also surfaced as an important cultural symbol for segments of society opposed to the push to modernize. In the Company of Men considers how these conflicting attitudes toward male-male sexuality manifested themselves in Meiji literary history.

 

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Contents

Illustrations
8
Nanshoku and EarlyMeiji Modernity
13
Cover of the Nomura edition of Shizu no odamaki
30
Illustration from the Nomura edition of Shizu no odamaki
33
Sawamura Tanosuke and EarlyMeiji Reinterpretations of Kabuki
36
Cover of Sawamura Tanosuke akebono zoshi
48
Illustration with text from Sawamura Tanosuke akebono zoshi
50
Illustration with text from Sawamura Tanosuke akebono zoshi
58
Sketch of Kiriyama Benroku
82
Historical Fiction and Modern Love
99
Frontispiece illustration from Shonen sugata
110
Illustration from Kocho
126
Nanshoku and Meiji Neoclassicism
133
Nanshoku and the LateMeiji Novel
163
Frontispiece illustration from the 1908 edition of Nowaki
186
Nanshoku and Naturalism in Mori Ogais Vita Sexualis
199

Frontispiece illustration from Sawamura Tanosuke akebono zoshi
62
Cover of Kagoshima Eimeiden
63
Nanshoku and Literary Reform
65

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About the author (2006)

Jim Reichert is Assistant Professor of Japanese Literature at Stanford University.

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