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Page 530 - No political dreamer was ever wild enough to think of breaking down the lines which separate the States, and of compounding the American people into one common mass.
Page 525 - All charges of war, and all other expenses that shall be incurred for the common defence or general welfare, and allowed by the united states in congress assembled, shall be defrayed out of a common treasury, which shall be supplied by the several states...
Page 561 - They form a portion of that immense mass of legislation, which embraces everything within the territory of a state, not surrendered to the general government ; all which can be most advantageously exercised by the states themselves.
Page 71 - Promote, then, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.
Page 567 - Do you favor the creation of a Federal Department of Education with a Secretary in the President's Cabinet?
Page 182 - Labor shall be to foster, promote, and develop the welfare of the wage earners of the United States, to improve their working conditions, and to advance their opportunities for profitable employment.
Page 560 - It is known that the very power now proposed as a means was rejected as an end by the Convention which formed the Constitution.
Page 290 - If there is no objection they will be inserted in the record. (The letters referred to are as follows:) PUBLISHING HOUSE ME CHURCH SOUTH, Richmond, Va., February 13, 1924.
Page 543 - That the said lands shall be granted or settled at such times, and under such regulations, as shall hereafter be agreed on by the United States, in Congress assembled, or any nine or more of them.
Page 11 - States," and by that name shall be known and have perpetual succession with the powers, limitations, and restrictions herein contained. SEC. 2. That the purpose and object of the said corporation shall be to elevate the character and advance the interests of the profession of teaching, and to promote the cause of education in the United States.

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