Page images
PDF
EPUB

338

340

..........

PAGE.

PAGE.

Luther and His Servant.................. ... 196 The Follower ..............

......... 276

Mark It. By S. B. .........

.... 100 The Garden-Tomb of Golgotha. By C.

Martin Luther's Letter to his Little Son. 148 W. E. Siegel............................ 116

Maxims for Parents.......................... 337 The Gentleman...................... ........... 343

Memorial Verses. By C. W. E. Siegel. 172 The Hebrew Toilette of the Olden Time 114

Mind Your Accents ............ ............... 304 The Kiffhäuser Legend. By N. C.

Miriam, the Sister of Moses. By the

Shaeffer ..

......... .... 168

Editor.........

325 The Last Week of the Year............... 16

Mischief Makers ................

240 The Legend of the Per-kio-men. By

Mother's Way................................. 210 Rev. C. Z. Weiser........ ....... 13

Moths in the Candle........... ............. 145 The Lesson of a New Year. By the

Old Funeral Customs in Long Island... 208

Editor .................................... 5

On Naming our Children.......

The Little Graves ............................. 117

Our Book Table.............................. 356 The Lost Child. By Rev. R. Leighton

Passing Ships.................

.... 342 Gerhart ........

17

Pernicious Compliments. By the Editor 164 The Mechanic in Search of Ways and

Plants of Scripture. By Geo. D. Phippen 137 Means. By the Editor............... 106

Pleasant Discipline........................... 212 The Meeting Place. By Horatius Bonar 384

Precocity of Some Great Writers......... The New Year among the Chinese. By

Put in Mind..............

the Editor..............

Queen Victoria at the Paper Mill.... .... 146 The New Year of the GUARDIAN. By

Ramblings along the Rhine and in Swit.

the Editor.

zerland. By the Editor ............... 261 The Old Emperor at Play with the

Recollections of Scotland. By the Editor 241 Children. By the Editor ............. 113

Recollections of Eminent German Schol-

The Old Hill-Side. By A. M. H........ 196

ars. By the Editor .................... 295 The Publican's Prayer. By Rev. C. Z.

Religion for Week-day Use.. ............. 275 Weiser..................................... 7

Religious Associations of the Presidents 341 The Rauhe Hause at Horn. By the

Respect the Boys...........

Editor ...........

......... 197

Rules for Promoting Brotherly Love..... 147

The Strong Hand............................ 145

Saving by Giving........... ..............

The Stump of a Sign Post. By the Editor 79

Some of the Trees of Palestine. By T. The Sunday-School Department, 51-59,

W. Chambers, D. D..... ............... 181 87-91, 118-123, 149–153, 184-187,

Song of the Brook............................ 275 215-219, 247-249, 279-283, 311-

Stilling and Gothe at the University of

313, 345-349, 370-373.
Strasburg. By the Editor............ 133 The Table Manners of Our Ancestors... 235

Stilling in Search of a Profession. By The Thorn-Crowned King. By the

the Editor.....

Editor.... ....................... IOI

Study Character.............. .............

The Two Sides; or, Then and Now.... 49

Synodical Reunions....

The Voice of Song. By Mary........... 233

Table Customs ................................. The Work-shops and Homes of Germany.

Thanksgiving Day in New England. By

By the Editor............................ 297

Henry Ward Beecher..

To Death........................................ 271

The Absent-minded Man................... To Whom it may Come......................
The Bat...................................

“ To the Lions."............ .........

The Blind Boy............................. Unter den Linden, Berlin, Europe. By

The Boasting Hen........................

the Editor.........

............ 229

The Boyhood of Jesus..................... Waiting for the Evening Train............
The Boy Organist............................ Weather Proverbs............................ 305
The Children at Church. By the Editor 15 Weights and Measures ...................... 307
The Christian Martyrs. By Rev. R. Well Regulated Family..................... 144

Leighton Gerhart........................ 177 What to Teach our Sons .................... 334

The Church Year. By S. P. Heilman, Where Ministers Come From..........

M. D ............

................ 84 Why He Takes Them.......................... 303

The City of Jericho. By the Editor.... 37 Why We Shake Hands and Kiss......... 240

The Dog and the Shadow .................. 298 | Writers of one Hymn ........................ 339

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

The Guardian.

VOL. XXVI.

JANUARY, 1875,

NO. 1.

BY THE EDITOR.

The New Year of the “Guardian." | pages of Sunday-school matter. From

six to eight pages will be devoted to Lessons. By aiding the teachers and helping to indoctrinate the children, we

accomplish a mission, in point of influWith this number the GUARDIAN

ence and importance second to no other enters upon its twenty-sixth year. It

in the Church. In this view, the GUARstarts the second quarter of a century

DIAN claims and deserves the services of its life and labors in a changed and of the best talent and most competent enlarged form. Its chief aim. from the writers in our ecclesiastical communion, beginning of its career has been to min-whose energetic assistance we most earnister to the young. The Sunday-school estly invoke. seeks to perform a similar mission. Both have a common aim. The bulk of our readers are directly or indirectly

The Lesson of a New Year. connected with and laboring for the Sun. day-school. Ought not both work hand

BY THE EDITOR. in hand in behalf of the young? Its publishers hold that its field of useful

“Thou glorious Past, thou sufferinz Past, thou

dear, dear Past! ness has widened, and that its pages

I can read ought to be adapted for the altered de- | A wondrous lesson in thy silent face." mands and wants of the times. With

-Euthanasy. this number the GUARDIAN steps upon A year, the past year, makes an ina higher and broader plane. Through teresting book. Every heart-throb prints the teachers it will seek to benefit and a word, every day fills a page—a word bless the thousands of Sunday-school that means something—a page with a scholars of the Church, and thus solemn lesson. Be it an idle word, or help to mould the plastic heart and in- an earnest and good one, it will live. form the active mind of childhood, at a Live like the forest leaves; though fallperiod of life the most favorable to re- en off in autumn and lost to the sight, ceive instruction. In order to win souls their properties are never lost, but will to Christ, we must begin our work at mingle with the earth to be reabsorbed the right end; not at the close but at by other plants. Thus our words, our the beginning of life. Bend the twig actions live on to the end of time for before it is stiffened into a hard-wooded ever. Live on in beings yet unborn, tree; turn the streamlet into the right in hearts which as yet are not. channel before it is swollen into a river ; Every face is to us a study, furnishmould the heart in tender youth, before ing a lesson for every thoughtful inind it has been hardened by age and evil to learn. Through it shines the soul habits.

made visible. Shines as does a lantern The GUARDIAN will hereafter be a in a light-tower, through whose colored Sunday-school teacher's helper. Each glass the light within heralds peril or number will contain from ten to twelve peace to the scaman, battling with

darkness and the waves. Thus every ovea a rough and stormy sea. The stern responsible being is a light-bearer. Ac-nations of old never praised the ship cording to the light we give will others setting sail with flying colors, but only be led to shipwreck or a safe port. that which came back with tattered and

- Let your light so shine before men that| torn sails and battered sides, stript of they may see your good works, and glorify her banners whilst she had outridden your Father which is in heaven."

the storm. The young are launching The passing years leave their impress their ship. In the harbor there is a on the human face -- their furrow-calm and smooth sea. Out on the ocean marks. They leave their foot-prints it is stormy and wild. Billows and even on the earth's surface. Its hilly breakers are ahead on the voyage of and hoary mountains are but the life. Christ alone can guide us safely rugged wrinkles of the ages past. Thus,

across. We may reach life's end, the too, the struggles and wounds of the haven of peace, with toil-worn, decrepid soul print their lines and scars in the bodies, but the ransomed soul shall gain countenance. Time touches all things

the victor's crown-a crown of joy unwith its ruthless hands--all things save fading. Old Ocean.

Each one has a specific lesson to learn “ Time writes no wrinkles on its azure brow.”

of the past year. God in mercy has

borne with our infirmities; He has The past, too, has a time-impresssed helped us over every rough place. face, looking at us, now smiling, now When tempted He succored us; when sad. Standing at the threshold of a guilty He pardoned. When sad He New Year, we take a parting look at cheered, when sorrowful He comforted. the old, just ending. Its face is still Troubled souls have found peace; turned towards us, as if to say, “ O heed tried souls have been made better by well the lessons I have taught thee." trial. At the graves of their children,

Singularly sad looks the countenance parents were comforted by the child of of the old year when seen from the be- Mary. Wives made widows have God ginning of a new one. Like the great for their friend. Children left orphans paintings, or paintings of the great, or have the All-pitying One for their perhaps both, which one meets with in Father. All have received numberless the fanious galleries of art. A heaven- mercies; the cup of God's goodness ly calm and peace perched on a storm- has been running over. ridden brow, one sees there. The The record of the year is about to Madonna at Dresden, so mild, peaceful close. On the day of final account, and heavenly, with the infant Jesus on dear reader, the Book of Omniscience her arms, so cherub-like and divine, and will bring to light all your acts and yet so human. Her face so strangely mine. The images of gladness and sadsad, as if the sword that pierced her ness rise before the mind. The year soul at the death of her Son, had already 1874 is fast ticking to its finish. So been felt at His birth. How very calm ticks the life of many a mortal to its looks the face of Luther, as painted by close, for whom the next will be the Lucas Cranach! Yet in this expressive last year on earth. face serenity is blended with sadness And now, dear reader, the GUARDIAN and subdued sorrow; reminding one most affectionately greets thee, wishing that this great soul spoke words which thee in the fullest and most real sense were “battles ;” that the lightning flash- a happy New Year. On earth we are ed from his lips and the thunder rolled but sojourners as all our fathers were. from his hands. Just like the face of Let us get closer to our Saviour, grasp The man who loved his flute and flung hands by faith and prayer around the his inkstand at the devil. Who romped cross. In the presence of this sorrow and laughed with his children, and we will hopefully and gratefully step wept as if his brave heart would break over into the New Year. Grace lifts at the bier of his little Margaret. Thus us above the clouds and storms of earth. we, too, see images of sadness and of By a penitent faith we become partakers gladness rise before the mind as we of His life; to do faithfully and well part from the year past.

at our post in Christ's army; bravely All earnest souls reach their port to fight life's battles, do its duties, devoutly engage in its Gospel worship-lous Temple, justified ? It is a multumthis is the best preparation for a happy | in-parvo prayer. The whole plan of and safe future, the only passage to the | redemption is considered in it. We New Year that knows no close, to the challenge any one, who can read it in land of the blest :

the original language, to say whether “Where the saints of all ages in harmony

he is not made to say, “ God, let an mert,

atoning sacrifice be made for me, a sinner, Their Saviour and brethren transported to graciously!He confesses, that he greet."

can be saved in no other way, but in

consequence of a gratuitous atonement. The Publican's Prayer.

The Greek word, on which his prayer hinges, signifies to be propitious through

sacrifice. The contrast, which the PhariBY REV. C. Z. WEISER.

see and Publican form, becomes a strik

ing one in this light. Compare them “ God be merciful to me, a sinner.'' briefly: The Pharisee relied on his (Luke xviii. 13.)

doing no harm, through his outward conA reckless youth died at a public

duct on the one side, and in his observ

ing the ordinances on the other, even house, away from parents and friends,

| beyond the letter. This was sufficient, some five years ago. The community

| as he thought. But what is there, acwas stirred, not so much by his sad| death, as by his still sadder life. What i

cording to his position, that will wash

his guilt away-his natural depravity ? a trinity of truths Claus Harms has |

A mere restraining, and a positive grace forged in this three-linked chain :

too, he, indeed, concedes in his prologue, As you love, you live;

-God, I thank Thee that I am not as As you live, you die;

other men are.A genuine Pharisee As you die, you fare!

was not silly enough to believe that he The kindly-disposed physician would could of himself become, or maintain an break the force of a perhaps too rash accepted righteousness. It is generally judgment, uttered over the prodigal's but flippantly said, “ The Pharisees fate, and quickly told the neighbors to thought they could acquire righteoussuspend their verdict, as he had himself ness of themselves.” They fancied they heard the unfortunate young man pray could abstain from transgressing, and near his end, the all-prevailing sigh :- observe the law, without the aid of God. “ God be merciful to me, a sinner !What then are we to think of the Many became fully satisfied by the Pharisee's thanksgiving-“God, I thank brief report, and buried him in hope. Thee,” &c.? No; a restraining and as

Now, without doubt, this is a famous sisting grace they did feel the need of, ejaculation for poor sinners such as we and acknowledged; but no atoning all are. When the great Hugo Grotius, grace--which the whole Jewish econoon his way to Sweden, was overtaken my prefigured and Jesus came to maniby a fatal illness at Rostock, he was fest. This feature—the necessity of an visited on his death-bed by an humble Atonement—the Pharisee in the parable Lutheran clergyman, Quistorp. He re- did not discern. The publican, howminded him, as every pastor should the ever, who might be supposed to see it dying, of his sins, known and unknown, still less, felt and gave expression to it and exhorted him not to rely on his in his prayer—“God, let such an merits and reputation, which filled the atonement be graciously made for me; world, but only on the grace of God in while I am a sinner, and a sinner so Jesus Christ, as the publican did. deeply dyed in guilt, that it is not posGrotius replied, I am that publican,” sible for me to be saved in any other and expired.

manner.” And wherein, now, lies the great vir | Nor need we wonder why, in so detue of that prayer which, apart from praved a Jew, so unbelieving a view of Church, Creed, and Sacraments, as we the gospel-plan should be cherished. might infer from the words of Jesus, It was not a new idea; but one pubsent that man down from the Temple, licly and solemnly preached by the cereand doubtless many up to a more glori-'mony and sacrifice of the Temple ser

vice. The loud and standing confession “ charms" to be had at the jeweler's so of the Mosaic economy was :-"Without delicately made as to exhibit the the shedding of blood there is no remission Lord's Prayer, the Creed, the Decaof sin.” The echo of this maxim the logue, the Lord's Supper, and other humble Publican's heart felt, and be great objects, through an opening no saw a refuge for himself alone in the larger than a needle's eye. Get one. Atoning Blood. But the Pharisee did | It is of more value than many heavier no longer see that, surrounded though he rings, pins, chains, and ear-bobs. And was with offerings and sacrifices. Hence, in like manner let us peer through the we may easily see why the prayer of narrow aperture of faith, into the inner the dissolute but believing tax-gatherer chamber of the Publican's prayer, that was heard and answered, rather than we may sce within the kingdom of God that of the outwardly correct, but in- --the cross, the altar, and the throne. wardly blinded Pharisee.

It is said the Emperor of China posHave we not here the old picture of sesses a secret chamber in which are Cain and Abel retouched ? The charac- stored the acts of the empire. By a ters are nominally different and relative-parrow window his subjects may gaze ly changed indeed, but their relation to in upon the history of their country. the Atonement is the same. Cain, not Long and gladly do the patriots of the feeling the necessity of a vicarious sac- Celestial empire feast their eyes there. rifice, brought but a thanksgiving offer- But a more celestial country may ing of the fruit of the ground." Abel, we discover through that straitened not less grateful than his brother, opening of the Publican's prayer, if brought that eucharistic offering too; our spirit be but as penitent and full but besides, also brought of the firstlings of faith as his. Pray it as he prayed it of his flock.It was by the latter fact, and you will go up to a higher temple, that he confessed himself a sinner, and as he went down from a lower temple a believer in a Messiah. This was done, justified. We prize it as the gospel in " by FAITH," as we are told, and, there- | a nut-shell. Let it not be emptied of fore, he obtained witness that he was its living and life-giving embryo, and righteous (a justified person). God thereby rendered but a shell indeed testifying by accepting his gifts, that nothing more. his faith in an atonement through the blood of the Lamb, was the only way in which He could save mankind. Thus the parable of the Pharisee and

Bethlehem. Publican and the history of Cain and Abel, present us cognate scenes and

BY THE EDITOR. lessons, though they stand generally at the portals of the Old and New Dispen

• Let us now go even unto Bethlehem, and

peus see this thing which is come to pass, which the sations.

Lord has made known to us.” Luke ii. 15. We are slow to believe, then, that

This town is called Bethlchem of the prayer of the Publican, which seems to be a bird's eye view of the

Judah to distinguish it from another

Bethlehem in Zebulon, west of Nazawhole plan of redemption fits so readily

reth. The prophets call it Ephratah on the tongue of the Creedless, Church

(Bethlehem Ephrata.) It is a very less, Christless man. There is a short,

old town. On this spot it bas stood for straight and open way back to God;

at lcast 3,500 years. Its name does but it leads not thither off the temple and altar, off Christ and His kingdom.

not occur in the list of villages which

Joshua assigned to Judah. In Judges The widow's mite is a poor, precedent

xvii., it is mentioned in connection with for a money-king, at the alms collec

an idolatrous Levite. Within a short tion to follow. And so, too, will the

distance from Bethlehem, by the way. moral man, or the impenitent soul find

side, is Rachel's tomb. It was soon the publican's prayer entirely too narrow a platform to stand upon in the

after Benjamin had been born that hour when men's souls are to be tried

| “Rachel died and was buried in the way

Uuto Ephrath, which is Bethlehem. And Ja. -unless they endorse its spirit as well

cob set a pillar upon her grave; that is the as its words. There are precious little pillar of Rachel's grave unto this day."

« PreviousContinue »