The Liberty of the Press, Speech, and Public Worship: Being Commentaries on the Liberty of the Subject and the Laws of England

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Macmillan and Company, 1880 - Electronic books - 568 pages

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OCLC: 4967174
Related Subjects: Freedom of the press -- Great Britain. | Freedom of speech -- Great Britain. | Freedom of religion -- Great Britain.
LCCN:JC

Contents

DIVISION OF THE LAW RELATING TO
61
Remedy against blasphemies
67
ABUSE OF FREE SPEECH BY SEDITIOUS WORDS AND WRITINGS
73
How far a seditious libel can be defined
80
Libels on the Sovereign
86
Libels on Ministers of State
92
Remedy by ex officio information of AttorneyGeneral for sedition
99
CHAPTER VI
105
Instances of libellous comments being breaches of privilege
112
Punishment for breach of privilege
119
LIBELS AND COMMENTS ON COURTS OF JUSTICE REPORTS OF TRIALS
121
When published reports of trials are treated as contempts
127
Publishing reports of a trial which occupies many days
129
Punishment for contempt
135
Libels on personal reputation
141
Distinction between slandering and scolding
147
Libelling classes of persons corporations and firms
153
Liability of bookseller and shopkeeper for libel
159
If the offence imputed is past and punished
165
actionable
175
Liability for repeating a slander or libel
182
216
183
Excuse of slander and libel as between those confidentially
189
Excuse of slander and libel in judicial proceedings
195
Conflict of courts of law and Parliament ended by statute
203
Remedies for libel
207
Form of trial of indictment or information for libel
215
Functions of judge in criminal trial for libel
222
Seizing and destroying blasphemous and seditious libels
228
CHAPTER XI
241
False analogies in early treatment of copyright
255
If there can be dedication of MS to public
261
Whether letters are joint property of writer and correspondent
268
Fixing price of book and compelling republication
274
When author has not the radical copyright
281
Infringement of copyright generally
287
Infringement by importation of pirated copies
293

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Page 160 - ... the law considers such publication as malicious unless it is fairly made by a person in the discharge of some public or private duty, whether legal or moral, or in the conduct of his own affairs, in matters where his interest is concerned.
Page 328 - ... no tradesman, artificer, workman, labourer, or other person whatsoever shall do or exercise any worldly labour, business or work of their ordinary callings, upon the Lord's Day, or any part thereof (works of necessity and charity only excepted...
Page 292 - Making of any manner of new Manufactures within this Realm, to the true and first Inventor and Inventors of such Manufactures, which others at the Time of Making such Letters...
Page 40 - ... against their ruinous consequences, and exert his whole faculties in pointing out the most advantageous changes in establishments which he considers to be radically defective, or sliding from their object by abuse.
Page 215 - Whereas printers, booksellers, and other persons have of late frequently taken the liberty of printing, reprinting, and publishing, or causing to be printed, reprinted, and published, books and other writings, without the consent of the authors or proprietors of such books and writings, to their very great detriment, and too often to the ruin of them and their families...
Page 229 - ... for their perishable trash. It was not for gain that Bacon, Newton, Milton, Locke, instructed and delighted the world.
Page 193 - ENACTED, that, On every Such trial, the jury sworn to try the issue may give a general verdict of guilty or not guilty upon the whole matter put in issue...
Page 81 - It is neither more nor less than this : that a man may publish anything which twelve of his countrymen think is not blamable...
Page 325 - I am always very well pleased with a country Sunday, and think, if keeping holy the seventh day were only a human institution, it would be the best method that could have been thought of for the polishing and civilizing of mankind. It is certain the country people would soon degenerate into a kind of savages and barbarians, were there not such frequent returns of a stated time, in which the whole village meet together with their best faces, and in their cleanliest habits, to converse with one another...
Page 92 - I think the fair position in which the law may be settled is this : that where the public conduct of a public man is open to animadversion and the writer who is commenting upon it makes imputations on his motives which arise fairly and legitimately out of his conduct, so that a jury shall say that the criticism was not only honest, but also well founded...

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