China's Second Revolution: Reform after Mao

Front Cover
Brookings Institution Press, Dec 1, 2010 - Political Science - 369 pages

China has, since 1976, been enmeshed in an extraordinary program of renewal and reform. The obvious changes—the T-shirts, blue jeans, makeup and jewelry worn by Chinese youth; the disco music blaring from radios and loudspeakers on Chinese streets; the television antennas mushrooming from both urban apartment complexes and suburban peasant housing; the bustling free markets selling meat, vegetables and clothing in China's major cities—reflect a fundamental shift in the government's policy toward the economy and political life.

Although doubts about the long-term commitment to reform arose after the student protests in December 1986 and the dismissal of Party General Secretary Hu Yaobang in January 1987, the scope of reform has been so broad and the pace of change so rapid, that the post-Mao era fully warrants Den Xiaoping's description of it as the "second revolution" undertaken by the Chinese Communist Party.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

China's second revolution: reform after Mao

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The pace and scope of reform in China over the past nine years have made standard interpretations date quickly. Harding (Brookings Institution) brings us up to the minute with an excellent assessment ... Read full review

Contents

Overview
xxi
The Origins of Reform
7
The Legacy of Mao Zedong
9
The Economic Legacy
11
The Tradition of Foreign Economic Relations
18
The Political Heritage
22
A Balance Sheet
27
The Pressures for Reform
36
Foreign Investment in China
157
Special Economic Zones and Open Cities
161
Conclusion
168
Liberalizing Political Life
170
The Moderate Political Reforms
172
The Limits to the Moderate Political Reforms
185
Proposals for Radical Reform
189
The Controversy over Radical Political Reforms
194

The Rise of the Reformers
38
The Chinese Political Spectrum in 1976
39
The Evolution of the Political Spectrum since the Death of Mao
46
Conclusion
64
The Course of Reform
68
A Chronology of Reform
69
The Division Between Moderate and Radical Reformers
75
The Politics of Reform
81
Conclusion
91
The Content of Reform
95
Restructuring the Economy
97
The Moderate Economic Reforms
99
The Radical Economic Reforms
118
Conclusion
126
Opening China to the World Economy
129
The Decentralization and Expansion of Trade
134
Trade Imbalances and Chinas Use of Foreign Credit
147
Technological Exchange
153
Conclusion
197
Institutionalizing the postMao Reforms
200
Reforming the Political Process
202
Redefining Organizational Roles and Relationships
212
Arranging for the Succession
226
Conclusion
233
The Future of Reform
235
China and the International Community
237
The Current Impact
240
Prospects
245
Implications for the United States
261
The Future of the Second Revolution
271
The Balance Sheet
265
The Political Base for Reform
278
Possible Scenarios
289
Notes
296
Index
353
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page ix - Foundation. The views expressed in the study are those of the author and should not be ascribed to any of the persons or organizations acknowledged above, or to the trustees, officers, or other staff members of the Brookings Institution. BRUCE K. MACLAURY President
Page xxii - the reforms have been the result of extraordinary political engineering by a coalition of reform-minded leaders led by Deng Xiaoping. That coalition used Deng's personal prestige, as well as the unresolved grievances of the Cultural Revolution (1966-76), to push Mao's immediate successor, Hua Guofeng, off the political stage and begin a massive

About the author (2010)

Harry Harding, a senior fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies program at Brookings since 1983, has written several books on China, including Organizing China, the 1986 recipient of the Masayoshi Ohira Memorial Prize. He is coeditor with B

Bibliographic information