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Books Books 1 - 10 of 42 on ... &c. To this smutty regiment, who attended the progresses, and rode in the carts....
" ... &c. To this smutty regiment, who attended the progresses, and rode in the carts with the pots and kettles, which, with every other article of furniture, were then moved from palace to palace, the people, in derision, gave the name of black guards,... "
Willis's Current Notes: A Series of Articles on Antiquities, Biography ... - Page 23
by George Willis - 1854
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The Works of Ben Jonson...: With Notes Critical and Explanatory ..., Volume 2

Ben Jonson, William Gifford - Dramatists, English - 1816
...lower still) the most forlorn wretches, seem to have been selected to carry coals to the kitchens, halls, &c. To this smutty regiment, who attended the...palace, the people, in derision, gave the name of black guards, a term since become sufficiently familiar, and never properly explained. Mr. Pinkerton,...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 184

William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, Sir John Murray IV, Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle) - English literature - 1896
...necessary for her domestic comfort, and a ' smutty regiment who attended the progresses rode in the cars with the pots and kettles, which, with every other...furniture, were then moved from palace to palace.' Fauns and satyrs fled before her as she rode through the woods, and Diana and her train received her...
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A new dictionary of the English language

Charles Richardson - 1839
...these the most forlorn wretches seem to have been selected to carry coals to the kitchens, halls, itc. To this smutty regiment, who attended the progresses, and rode in the carts with the pots and kettles, the people, in derision, gave the name of 4/acAguards." — Oifford on B. Jonson. D. & Ger. Black....
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William Shakspere: A Biography, Book 2

Charles Knight - 1843 - 542 pages
...common and remarkable to have afforded us one of our most significant and popular words : " To the smutty regiment, who attended the progresses, and...palace, the people, in derision, gave the name of black guards, — a term since become sufficiently familiar, and never properly explained." t The palaces...
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The works of Shakspere, revised from the best authorities: with a ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1843
...the most forlorn •retches seem to have been selected to carry coals to ths kiirliens, halls, itc. To this smutty regiment, who attended the progresses,...pots and kettles, which, with every other article of furnitnre, were then moved from palace to palace, the people in derision, gave the name of black-guards;...
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The Chronicles of the White Rose of York: A Series of Historical Fragments ...

John Allen Giles - Great Britain - 1843 - 310 pages
...to attend the woodyards, sculleries, etc. Of these the most forlorn wretches seem to have kitchens, halls, &c. To this smutty regiment, who attended the...progresses, and rode in the carts with the pots and kettles, the people, in derision, gave the name of 'BLACKGUARDS.' "—(Gifford.) p. i750 AD i459. the manifest...
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The Works of Shakespere, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1843
...lower still), tlie most forlorn wretches seem to have been selected to carry coals to tbe kitchens, halls, &c. To this smutty regiment, who attended the...progresses, and rode in the carts with the pots and kettle*, which, with every other article of furnitnre, were then moved from palace to palace, the people...
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The Chronicles of the White Rose of York: A Series of Historical Fragments ...

Great Britain - 1845 - 310 pages
...these the most forlorn wretches seem to have been selected to carry coals to the kitchens, halls, úc. To this smutty regiment, who attended the progresses, and rode in the carts with the pots and kettles, the people, in derision, gave the name of ' BLACKGUARDS.' "—(Gifford.) AD USB. the manifest injury...
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Shakespeare's Plays: With His Life, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1847
...a lower still) the most forlorn wretches seem to have been selected to carry coals to the kitchen, hing do, but wish and beg Your sudden coming o'er,...lord ? King. Laertes, was your father dear to you ? removed from palace to palace, the people in derision gave the name of blackguards ; a term since become...
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The Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, and Poems of William Shakspere, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1851
...still) the most forlorn wretehes seem to have been seleeted to earry eoals to the kitehens, halls, &e. To this smutty regiment, who attended the progresses, and rode in the earte with the pots and kettles, whieh, with every other artiele of furniture, were then moved from...
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