Annual Report of the Secretary of the Board of Agriculture

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Page 22 - This was my curious labor all summer, — to make this portion of the earth's surface, which had yielded only cinquefoil, blackberries, johnswort, and the like, before, — sweet wild fruits and pleasant flowers, — produce instead this pulse.
Page 216 - Congress, according to the census of 1860, for the "endowment, support and maintenance of at least one college, where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, ... in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life.
Page 256 - ... part of it, determined to let them grow, and they soon formed a flourishing grove. As soon as they were well grown, a fine spring appeared in place of the occasional rill, and furnished abundant water in the longest droughts. For forty or fifty years this spring was considered the best in the Clos du Doubs. A few years since, the grove was felled, and the ground turned again to a pasture. The spring disappeared with the wood, and is now as dry as it was ninety years ago.
Page 256 - Becquerel, as quoted by Mr. Marsh, says : "In the valley of the Rhone a simple hedge, two metres in height, is sufficient protection for a distance of twenty-two metres.
Page 284 - ... there is no such division in the soul itself, since it is the whole soul that remembers, understands, wills, or imagines..
Page 178 - Thou shalt plant vineyards, and dress them, but shalt neither drink of the wine, nor gather the grapes; for the worms shall eat them.
Page 255 - The Wolf Spring, in the commune of Soubey, furnishes a remarkable example of the influences of the woods upon fountains. A few years ago this spring did not exist. At the place where it now rises, a small thread of water was observed after very long rains, but the stream disappeared with the rain. The spot is in the middle of a very steep pasture, inclining to the South.
Page 286 - But in what does the character of man as a moral agent consist? Man is a moral agent only as he is accountable for his actions, — in other words, as he is the object of praise or blame ; and this he is, only inasmuch as he has prescribed to him a rule of duty, and as he is able to act, or not to act, in conformity with its precepts. The possibility of morality thus depends on the possibility of liberty ; for if man be not a free agent, he is not the author of his actions, and has, therefore, no...
Page 255 - such has been the changes in the flow of the Milwaukee River, even while the area from which it receives its supply is but partially cleared, that the proprietors of most of the mills and factories have found it necessary to resort to the use of steam, at a largely increased yearly cost, to supply the deficiency of water-power in dry seasons of the year.
Page 253 - ... Twenty years ago peaches were a profitable crop in Massachusetts; now we must depend on New Jersey and Delaware for our supply; and our apples and other orchard fruits now come from beyond the limits of New England. The failure of these and other crops in the older States is generally ascribed to the exhaustion of the soil ; but with greater reason it can be referred to the destruction of the forests which sheltered us from the cold winds of the north and west, and which, keeping the soil under...

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