The Valachi Papers

Front Cover
Putnam, 1968 - Crime - 285 pages
The First Inside Account of the Mafia In the 1960s a disgruntled soldier in New York's Genovese Crime Family decided to spill his guts. His name was Joseph Valachi. Daring to break the Mob's code of silence for the first time, Valachi detailed the organization of organized crimefrom the capos, or bosses, of every Family, to the hit men who "clipped" rivals and turncoats. With a phenomenal memory for names, dates, addresses, phone numbers -- and where the bodies were buried -- Joe Valachi provided the chilling facts that led to the arrest and conviction of America's major crime figures. The rest is history. Never again would the Mob be protected by secrecy. For the Mafia, Valachi's name would become synonymous with betrayal. But his stunning exposÉ . broke the back of America's Cosa Nostra and stands I today as the classic about America's Mob, a fascinat ing tale of power and terror, big money, crime ... and murder.

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Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
25
Section 3
48
Copyright

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About the author (1968)

Peter Maas was born in New York on June 27, 1929. He graduated from Duke University in 1949 and served in the U. S. Navy during the Korean War. After the war, he became a journalist and wrote for such magazines as Collier's, Look, Saturday Evening Post, and New York Magazine. His nonfiction works include Marie, Manhunt, and Underboss. The Valachi Papers and Serpico were adapted into films. He died on August 23, 2001 at the age of 72.

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