Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency

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John D. Kelly, Beatrice Jauregui, Sean T. Mitchell, Jeremy Walton
University of Chicago Press, Apr 15, 2010 - Social Science - 408 pages
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Global events of the early twenty-first century have placed new stress on the relationship among anthropology, governance, and war. Facing prolonged insurgency, segments of the U.S. military have taken a new interest in anthropology, prompting intense ethical and scholarly debate. Inspired by these issues, the essays in Anthropology and Global Counterinsurgency consider how anthropologists can, should, and do respond to military overtures, and they articulate anthropological perspectives on global war and power relations.

This book investigates the shifting boundaries between military and civil state violence; perceptions and effects of American power around the globe; the history of counterinsurgency doctrine and practice; and debate over culture, knowledge, and conscience in counterinsurgency. These wide-ranging essays shed new light on the fraught world of Pax Americana and on the ethical and political dilemmas faced by anthropologists and military personnel alike when attempting to understand and intervene in our world.

 

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Contents

Culture Counterinsurgency Conscience
1
The Blue in Green and the Other
17
SECTION 2 Ethnographic Experiences of American Power in the Age of the War on Terror
85
Precedents to the Manual
149
SECTION 4 The US Military and US Anthropology
209
SECTION 5 Constructions and Destructions of Conscience
273
Reference List
355
List of Contributors
381
Index
385
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About the author (2010)

John D. Kelly is professor of anthropology at the University of Chicago. Beatrice Jauregui is visiting fellow at the Center for the Advanced Study of India. Sean T. Mitchell is assistant professor of anthropology at Rutgers University. Jeremy Walton is assistant professor of religion at New York University.

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