Shakespeare & Stratford

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Page 177 - He had, by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company, and, amongst them, some that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing engaged him more than once in robbing a park that belonged to Sir Thomas Lucy, of Charlcote, near Stratford.
Page 91 - Sweet Swan of Avon! what a sight it were To see thee in our Water yet appear, And make those flights upon the banks of Thames That so did take Eliza, and our James!
Page 124 - HABET. STAY PASSENGER, WHY GOEST THOU BY so FAST, READ, IF THOU CANST, WHOM ENVIOUS DEATH HATH PLAST WITHIN THIS MONUMENT, SHAKESPEARE, WITH WHOME QUICK NATURE DIDE; WHOSE NAME DOTH DECK YS TOMBE FAR MORE THEN COST ; SITH ALL YT HE HATH WRITT LEAVES LIVING ART BUT PAGE TO SERVE HIS WITT.
Page 132 - FEAR no more the heat o' the sun Nor the furious winter's rages ; Thou thy worldly task hast done, Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages : Golden lads and girls all must, As chimney-sweepers, come to dust. Fear no more the frown o...
Page 91 - WHAT needs my Shakespeare for his honoured bones The labour of an age in piled stones ? Or that his hallowed reliques should be hid Under a star-ypointing pyramid ? Dear son of memory, great heir of fame, What need'st thou such weak witness of thy name ? Thou in our wonder and astonishment Hast built thyself a livelong monument.
Page 178 - A parliament member, a justice of peace, At home a poor scarecrow, at London an asse, If lowsie is Lucy, as some volke miscalle it, Then Lucy is lowsie, whatever befall it. He thinks himself great ; Yet an asse in his state, We allow, by his ears, but with asses to mate. If Lucy is lowsie as some volke miscall it, Then sing lowsie Lucy whatever befall it speare did not wait to brave the united puissance of a Knight of the Shire and a country attorney.
Page 81 - What years, i' faith? Vio. About your years, my lord. DUKE. Too old, by heaven : let still the woman take An elder than herself : so wears she to him, So sways she level in her husband's heart...
Page 179 - To covet so much deer, "When horns enough upon his head "Most plainly did appear. "Had not his worship one deer left? "What then? He had a wife "Took pains enough to find him horns "Should last him during life."3 Joshua Barnes, who lived from 1654 to 1712' was a Greek scholar and antiquary who belonged to Emmanuel College, Cambridge.
Page 177 - He was much given to all unluckiness, in stealing venison and rabbits ; particularly from Sir Lucy, who had him oft whipped, and sometimes imprisoned, and at last made him fly his native country, to his great advancement. But his revenge was so great, that he is his Justice Clodpate, and calls him a great man, and that, in allusion to his name, bore three louses rampant for his arms.
Page 107 - But higher even than the genius we rate the character of this unique man, and the grand impersonality of what he wrote. What has he told us of himself? In our self-exploiting nineteenth century, with its melancholy liver-complaint, how serene and high he seems ! If he had sorrows, he has made them the woof of everlasting consolation to his kind ; and if, as poets are wont to whine, the outward world was cold to him, its biting air did but trace itself in loveliest frost-work of fancy on the many...

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