Traditions of Edinburgh, Volume 1

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Page 138 - THE harp that once through Tara's halls The soul of music shed, Now hangs as mute on Tara's walls As if that soul were fled. So sleeps the pride of former days, So glory's thrill is o'er, And hearts that once beat high for praise Now feel that pulse no more.
Page 270 - In the course of our conversation this day it came out that Lady Eglintoune was married the year before Dr. Johnson was born; upon which she graciously said to him that she might have been his mother, and that she now adopted him; and when we were going away, she embraced him, saying, " My dear son, farewell!" My friend was much pleased with this day's entertainment, and owned that I had done well to force him out.
Page 269 - Her figure was majestic, her manners high-bred, her reading extensive, and her conversation elegant. She had been the admiration of the gay circles of life, and the patroness of poets. Dr. Johnson was delighted with his reception here. Her principles in church and state were congenial with his. She knew all his merit, and had heard much of him from her son, Earl Alexander ('), who loved to cultivate the acquaintance of men of talents in every department.
Page 128 - The Tinklarian Doctor (for such was his popular appellation) appears to have been fully acquainted with an ingenious expedient, which we observe practised by many publishers of juvenile toy-books in our own day, — namely, that of self-recommendation. As in certain sage little histories of Tommy and Harry, King Pepin, &c., we are sure to find that " the good boy who loved his lessons" always bought his books from
Page 295 - Queensberry has signalized her friendship to me upon this occasion, in such a conspicuous manner, that I hope (for her sake) you will take care to put your fork to all its proper Uses, and suffer nobody for the future to put their knives in their mouths.
Page 296 - She has so much goodness, virtue, and generosity, that if you knew her, you would have a pleasure in obeying her as I do. She often wishes she had known you.
Page 266 - Supremely blest by heaven, heav'n's richest grace Confest is thine, an early blooming race, Whose pleasing smiles shall guardian Wisdom arm, Divine instruction ! taught of thee to charm. What transports shall they to thy soul impart! (The conscious transports of a parent's heart.) When thou behold'st them of each grace possest, And sighing youths imploring to be blest, After thy image form'd with charms like thine, Or in the visit, or the dance to shine.
Page 175 - No sooner did the girls perceive what sort of landing-place their kitten had found, than in terror or surprise they began to draw it up ; but this measure was now too late, for along with the animal, up also came the Judge's wig, fixed full in its determined talons. His Lordship's surprise, on finding his wig lifted off his head, was...
Page 266 - Bashfulness appears, And backward Merit loses all its fears. Supremely blest by Heaven, Heaven's richest grace Confest is thine, an early blooming race ; Whose pleasing smiles shall guardian wisdom arm, — Divine Instruction ! — taught of thee to charm, What transports shall they to thy soul impart, (The conscious transports of a parent's heart,) When thou behold'st them of each grace possest, And sighing youths imploring to...
Page 293 - EDINBURGH, the \st of June, I may say the first of Summer, 1734. MY DEAR, DEAR LADY SUFFOLK, — The pleasantest thing I have met with a great while was your letter yesterday noon. I devoured that instead of my dinner, and found it better support than all the Scotch beef in the country. Apropos, you have half your wish : the cook maid is very dirty about herself; but she says it is her way ; she was never otherwise.

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