The Theology of Karl Barth: Exposition and Interpretation

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Ignatius Press, 1992 - Religion - 444 pages
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Written in 1951 (with a second edition in 1961), this book takes its place within an impressive array of attempts to wrestle with Karl Barth's theology from a Catholic point of view. The book adopts the twofold strategy of presenting an exposition of "the whole of Barth's thought," while doing so for the purpose of a confessional dialogue among theologians. Not to be construed as an "Introduction to the Theology of Karl Barth, Balthasar's effort is to provide a Catholic response which, though not "official", nonetheless seeks to express a common direction and movement within Catholicism.

The Theology of Karl Barth shows how a rethinking of basic issues in fundamental theology—concerning the relation of nature and grace, philosophy and theology, the "analogy of being" and the "analogy of faith"—might lead to a rapprochement between the two great rivers of Christianity, without compromising the center of gravity of either. In the process the book makes a major contribution to renewed understanding of Christianity in a secularized modern world. Co-published with Communio Books.

"No one should think he can quickly dispose of questions posed here offhandedly. It was precisely because writers were in the habit during the time of the Reformation of theologizing with a hammer that the split in the Church became irreparable. And to work at overcoming this split means much effort. Only the patient need apply." 

— Hans Urs von Balthasar

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User Review  - Scott Kirkpatrick - Christianbook.com

This is an excellent book written by a top Catholic theologian about the greatest Protestant theologian of the 20th century- Karl Barth. It will serve as a good introduction into the theology and work ... Read full review

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About the author (1992)

Hans Urs von Balthasar (1905-88), a Swiss theologian and priest, is considered by many the most important Catholic theologian of the twentieth century. Incredibly prolific and diverse, he wrote over one hundred books and many hundreds of articles. A favorite theologian and spiritual writer of Pope Francis, as well as the two previous Popes, he was called the most cultured man of our time by Henri de Lubac, and Karl Rahner described his achievements as really breathtaking.

Edward T. Oakes, S.J., is professor of systematic theology at the University of St. Mary of the Lake / Mundelein Seminary in Mundelein, Illinois.

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