Narratives from Criminal Trials in Scotland, Volume 1

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Chapman and Hall, 1852 - Crime
 

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Page 56 - For why ? — because the good old rule Sufficeth them, the simple plan, That they should take, who have the power, And they should keep who can.
Page 239 - The housewives tun not work, nor the milk churn ! Writhe children's wrists, and suck their breath in sleep, Get vials of their blood ! and where the sea Casts up his slimy ooze, search for a weed To open locks with,* and to rivet charms, Planted about her in the wicked feat Of all her mischiefs, which are manifold.
Page 302 - I REQUIRE and charge you both, as ye will answer at the dreadful day of judgment when the secrets of all hearts shall be disclosed, that if either of you know any impediment, why ye may not be lawfully joined together in Matrimony, ye do now confess it. For be ye well assured, that so many as are coupled together otherwise than God's Word doth allow are not joined together by God; neither is their Matrimony lawful.
Page 56 - What need of books ? Burn all the statutes and their shelves : They stir us up against our kind ; And worse, against ourselves. We have a passion — make a law, Too false to guide us or control ! And for the law itself we fight In bitterness of soul. And, puzzled, blinded thus, we lose Distinctions that are plain and few : These find I graven on my heart : That tells me what to do.
Page 242 - If you can look into the seeds of time, And say, which grain will grow, and which will not, Speak then to me, who neither beg, nor fear, Your favours, nor your hate.
Page 114 - Trade will increase trade, and money will beget money, and the trading world shall need no more to want work for their hands, but will rather want hands for their work.
Page 306 - ... he could take away a man's life, though in truth he could do no such thing, yet this were a just law made by the state ; that whosoever should turn his hat thrice and cry buz, with an intention to take away a man's life, shall be put to death.
Page 273 - Hattock' also, and was immediately caught up and transported through the air by the fairies, to that place, where, after he had...
Page 299 - His nailes upon all his fingers were riven and pulled off with an instrument called in Scottish a Turkas, which in England wee call a payre of pincers, and under everie nayle there was thrust in two needels over even up to the heads...
Page 138 - The troops of Tema looked, The companies of Sheba waited for them. They were confounded because they had hoped; They came thither, and were ashamed.

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