Historic memorials of Coldstream abbey, Berwickshire, collected by a delver in antiquity

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Page 2 - Nynias, a most reverend bishop and holy man of the British nation, who had been regularly instructed at Rome in the faith and mysteries of the truth...
Page 12 - Christ in his kingdom ; wherein, when the bishop, who was not skilful in the English tongue, preached the gospel, it was most delightful to see the king himself interpreting the word of God to his earls and thanes, for he had perfectly learned the Irish language during his long banishment.
Page 39 - They have two tunics with cowls, but no additional garment in winter, though, if they think fit, in summer they may lighten their garb. They sleep clad and girded, and never after matins return to their beds: but they so order the time of matins that it shall be light ere the lauds begin; so intent are they on their rule, that they think no jot or tittle of it should be disregarded. Directly after these hymns they sing the prime, after which they go out to work for stated hours. They complete whatever...
Page 39 - Easter, through regard for whatever festival, they do not take more than one meal a day, except on Sunday. They never leave the cloister but for the purpose of labour, nor do they ever speak, either there or elsewhere, save only to the abbot or prior. They pay unwearied attention to the canonical services, making no addition to them except the vigil for the defunct. They use in their divine service the Ambrosian chants and hymns, as far as they were able to learn them at Milan.
Page 11 - Christian faith, whereof he had found happy experience in vanquishing the barbarians, sent to the elders of the Scots, among whom himself and his followers, when in banishment, had received the sacrament of baptism, desiring they would send him a bishop, by whose instruction and ministry the English nation, which he governed, might be taught the advantages, and receive the sacraments of the Christian faith. Nor were they slow in granting his request ; but sent him Bishop Aidan, a man of singular...
Page 39 - ... attending to his flock; except that he does not eat with the rest, because his table is with the strangers and the poor. Nevertheless, be he where he may, he is equally sparing of food and of speech; for never more than two dishes are served either to him or to his company; lard and meat never but to the sick. From the Ides of September till Easter, through regard for whatever festival, they do not take more than one meal a day, except on Sunday.
Page 2 - British nation, who had been regularly instructed at Rome, in the faith and mysteries of the truth; whose episcopal see, named after St. Martin the bishop, and famous for a stately church (wherein he and many other saints rest in the body), is still in existence, among the English nation. The place belongs to the province of the Bernicians, and is generally called the White House, — Candida casa — because there was built a church of stone, which was not usual among the Britons.
Page 37 - Church was full of their high reputation and the opinion of their sanctity, as it were with the odour of some Divine balsam, and there is no country or province wherein this vine, loaded with blessings, has not spread its branches?
Page 62 - Et sciendu', q' p'fati moachi in obitu meo facient seruiciu' pro me sicud p' uno moacho ; & si m' placu'it, corpus meu' recipie't ad sepulturam. Hiis t', Rob'to filio Ursy, Joh'e filio ejus, & aliis." " Know men present and future, that I, Robert, son of Hugh de Wude, have given, and granted, and by this my present charter have confirmed, to God and S.
Page 38 - Certainly many of their regulations seem severe, and more particularly these: they wear nothing made with furs or linen, nor even that finely spun linen garment, which we call Staminium ;* neither breeches, unless when sent on a journey, which at their return they wash and restore. They have two tunics with cowls, but no additional garment in winter, though, if they think fit, in summer they may lighten their garb. They sleep clad and girded, and never after matins return to their beds...

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