The ladies' work-table book

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Contents

I
17
III
31
IV
43
V
66
VI
73
VII
77
VIII
86
IX
95
XIII
118
XIV
137
XV
158
XVI
171
XVII
182
XVIII
194
XIX
197
XX
203

X
99
XI
107
XII
110
XXI
217
XXII
225
XXIII
232

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Page 33 - Running. — Take three threads, leave three; and, in order that the work may be kept as firm as possible, back-stitch occasionally. If you sew selvages, they must be joined evenly together; but if raw edges, one must be turned down once, and the other laid upon it, but a few threads from the top : in this case, it must be felled afterwards.
Page 30 - In the beholding, and the glories share Of visionary battle. This bright art Did zealous Europe learn of pagan hands. While she assay'd, with rage of holy war, To desolate their fields : but old the skill : Long were the Phrygians' picturing looms renown'd; Tyre also, wealthy seat of arts, excell'd, And elder Sidon, in th
Page 199 - ... straight open hem. The appearance is the same, but the pattern is a curve, or other shape. CHAIN STITCH. — This is often employed in lace work. Make a knot, at the end of the cotton, and draw it through to the right side. While you put in the needle, let the end hang loose, and bring it out below, so as to incline a little to the left hand ; pass the needle over the cotton, as you draw it out, and this will form a loop : each succeeding one is done in the same manner. PEARLING. — This is...
Page 197 - SATIN STITCH. — This resembles the threads in satin, and is much used in embroidery. You make a knot at the end of the cotton, silk, or worsted; and bring it through the material on which you intend to work, from the under side to the upper one. Next, the needle is again put through to the under side, at about...
Page 30 - To raise at once our reverence and delight, To elevate the mind and charm the sight, To pour religion through th' attentive eye, And waft the soul on wings of extacy ; For this the mimic art with nature vies, And bids the visionary form arise.
Page 197 - ... This resembles the threads in satin, and is much used in embroidery. You make a knot at the end of the cotton, silk, or worsted; and bring it through the material on which you intend to work, from the under side to the upper one. Next, the needle is again put through to the under side, at about half an inch distance, and is then put back and brought to the upper side, about half way from the first point ; the next stitch is carried to the same distance from the second ; again the needle is brought...
Page xii - ... to the fabrics submitted to its operations. No one can look upon THE NEEDLE, without emotion ; it is a constant companion throughout the pilgrimage of life. We find it the first instrument of use placed in the hand of budding childhood, and it is found to retain its usefulness and charm, even when trembling in the grasp of fast declining age.
Page 116 - ... of thought and attention is bestowed upon them, to make her a proficient in this delightful employment. With one or two additional remarks, we will conclude this portion of our labors. The young votary of the needle must recollect that, if she allows her fondness for this accomplishment to draw off her attention, from the more serious or useful business of life, she will act decidedly wrong, and had far better never learn it at all. Another thing to be especially guarded against, is, not to devote...
Page 70 - Tinhemmed cloths, which are for domestic use. Little girls of the humbler classes might be employed by the more affluent, in making up those articles, and a suitable remuneration be given them. They would thus become more sensible of the value of time, and would contract habits of industry, which would be of essential service to them in the more advanced stages of their progress through life. A fair price paid for work done, either by a child or an adult, is far preferable to what is called charity....
Page ix - ... it will be admitted as a fact ot the utmost importance, thai every thing should be done to improve the taste, cultivate the understanding, and elevate the character of those " high priestesses " of our domestic sanctuaries. The page of history informs us, that the progress of any nation in morals, civilization, and refinement, is in proportion to the elevated or degraded position in which woman is placed in society; and the same instructive volume will enable us to perceive, that the fanciful...

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