London Society, Volume 9

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William Clowes and Sons, 1866
 

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Page 207 - If he has children, they are to be taken from him. If he has a profession, he is to be driven from it. He is cut by the higher orders, and hissed by the lower. He is, in truth, a sort of whipping-boy, by whose vicarious agonies all the other transgressors of the same class are, it is supposed, sufficiently chastised. We reflect very complacently on our own severity, and compare with great pride the high standard of morals established in England with the Parisian laxity. At length our anger is satiated....
Page 207 - But once in six or seven years our virtue becomes outrageous. We cannot suffer the laws of religion and decency to be violated. We must make a stand against vice. We must teach libertines that the English people appreciate the importance of domestic ties. Accordingly some unfortunate man, in no respect more depraved than hundreds whose offences have been treated with lenity, is singled out as an expiatory sacrifice.
Page 275 - Peter and Paul the apostles, every man's door being shadowed with green birch, long fennel, St John's wort, orpin, white lilies, and such like, garnished upon with garlands of beautiful flowers, had also lamps of glass, with oil burning in them all the night; some...
Page 206 - We know no spectacle so ridiculous as the British public in one of its periodical fits of morality. In general, elopements, divorces, and family quarrels, pass with little notice. We read the scandal, talk about it for a day, and forget it. But once in six or seven years our virtue becomes outrageous. We cannot suffer the laws of religion and decency to be violated. We must make a stand against vice.
Page 332 - I have been in the Indies, where this herb grows, where neither myself, nor a dozen gentlemen more of my knowledge, have received the taste of any other nutriment in the world, for the space of one and twenty weeks, but the fume of this simple only: therefore, it cannot be, but 'tis most divine.
Page 280 - Companies, wealthier and more influential than the rest, are the Mercers, Grocers , Drapers , Fishmongers . Goldsmiths , Skinners , Merchant Taylors, Haberdashers, Salters, Ironmongers, Vintners, and Clothworkers.
Page 333 - Upmost, at the groom porters, all the Christmas: And for the whole year through, at every place, Where there is play, present him with the chair; The best attendance, the best drink ; sometimes Two glasses of Canary, and pay nothing...
Page 180 - ... the image of St Paul, gold ; the face, hands, feet, and sword, of silver ; and as soon as the said Robert shall see the mayor, aldermen, and sheriffs come on foot out of the church...
Page 570 - Cade. Nay, that I mean to do. Is not this a lamentable thing, that of the skin of an innocent lamb should be made parchment ? that parchment, being scribbled o'er, should undo a man?
Page 370 - In the management of his own commercial affairs he certainly did not fail. The greatest proof of his influence in the monetary world appeared in 1818. " There are six great powers in Europe — England, France, Russia, Austria, Prussia, and Baring Brothers," said the Due do Richelieu in that year ; and with reason.

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