Practical Blacksmithing: A Collection of Articles Contributed at Different Times by Skilled Workmen to the Columns of "The Blacksmith and Wheelwright" ...

Front Cover
Milton Thomas Richardson
M. T. Richardson, 1891 - Blacksmithing
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 249 - The box is then placed in a furnace and allowed to remain there for about twelve hours, when the articles are taken out and quickly immersed in water, care being taken to put them in the water endways to avoid warping them. Articles to be casehardened in the above manner should have pieces of sheet iron fitted in them in all parts where they are required to fit well and are difficult to bend when cold. Suppose, for instance, it is a quadrant for a link motion : fit into the slot where the die works...
Page 226 - The thickness of the heads for a rough bolt shall be equal to one-half the distance between its parallel sides. The thickness of the nut shall be equal to the diameter of the bolt. The thickness of the head for a finished bolt shall be equal to the thickness of the nut. The distance between the parallel sides of a bolt head and nut, and the thickness of the nut, shall be one-sixteenth of an inch less for finished work than for rough.
Page 227 - The thickness of the heads for rough bolts shall be equal to one-half of the distance between their parallel sides. The thickness of the nut shall be equal to the diameter of the bolt. The thickness of the head for a finished bolt shall be equal to the thickness of the nut. The distance between the parallel sides of a bolthead and nut and the thickness of the nut shall be one-sixteenth of an inch less for finished work than for rough.
Page 93 - I use a long, cast iron, oil heater, made for the purpose ; the oil is brought to a boiling heat, the wheel is placed on a stick, so as to hang in the oil, each felly an hour, for a common sized felly..
Page 257 - Ex. Required the weight of a uniform rectangular beam of cast iron, 16 feet in length, 11 inches in breadth, and 1-| inch in thickness.
Page 227 - ... surface at the top and bottom equal to one-eighth of the pitch. The pitches shall be as follows, viz. : '•' The distance between the parallel sides of a bolt head and nut, for a rough bolt, shall be equal to one and a half diameters of the bolt plus one-eighth of an inch. The thickness of the heads for a rough bolt shall be equal to one-half the distance between its parallel sides. The thickness of the nut shall be equal to the Diameter of bolt... } A i A i A f I f \\l\ is H If H 1* 1} 1} No.
Page 93 - I ironed a wagon some years ago for my own use, and before putting on the tires I filled the felloes with linseed oil, and the tires have worn out and were never loose. I...
Page 93 - ... felly.. The timber should be dry, as green timber will not take oil. Care should be taken that the oil be not made hotter than a boiling heat, in order that the timber be not burnt. Timber filled with oil...

Bibliographic information