The Colonization of the South

Front Cover
subscribers only, 1904 - Southern States - 494 pages

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Page 451 - For every skin or piece of vellum or parchment, or sheet or piece of paper...
Page 452 - Resolved, therefore, That the general assembly of this colony have the sole right and power to lay taxes and impositions upon the inhabitants of this colony; and that every attempt to vest such power in any person or persons whatsoever, other than the general assembly aforesaid, has a manifest tendency to destroy British as well as American freedom.
Page 59 - Also we do, for Us, our Heirs, and Successors, Declare, by these Presents, that all and every the Persons, being our Subjects, which shall dwell and inhabit within every or any of the said several Colonies...
Page 59 - Resolved, That by two royal charters, granted by King James the First, the colonists, aforesaid, are declared entitled to all the privileges, liberties and immunities of denizens and natural born subjects, to all intents and purposes, as if they had been abiding and born within the realm of England.
Page 125 - «welcome ; I am more glad to see you than any man in Virginia. Mr. Drummond you shall be hanged in half an hour.
Page 58 - Manor of East Greenwich in the County of Kent in free and Common Soccage and not in Capite or by Knights Service.
Page 452 - The members of this congress, sincerely devoted, with the warmest sentiments of affection and duty, to his majesty's person and government, inviolably attached to the present happy establishment of the protestant succession, and with minds deeply impressed by a sense of the present and impending misfortunes of the British colonies on this continent ; having considered as maturely as time will permit, the circumstances of the said colonies...
Page 162 - III. [109] c. 22. that all laws, by-laws, usages, and customs, which shall be in practice in any of the plantations, repugnant to any law, made or to be made in this kingdom relative to the said plantations, shall be utterly void and of none effect.
Page 157 - Proprietary governments, granted out by the crown to individuals, in the nature of feudatory principalities, with all the inferior regalities, and subordinate powers of legislation, which formerly belonged to the owners of counties palatine...
Page 452 - That it is inseparably essential to the freedom of a people, and the undoubted right of Englishmen, that no taxes be imposed on them, but with their own consent, given personally, or by their representatives.

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