Imperial Russian Foreign Policy

Front Cover
Hugh Ragsdale, V. N. Ponomarev
Cambridge University Press, Oct 29, 1993 - History - 457 pages
1 Review
Imperial Russian Foreign Policy aims to demythologise a field hitherto dominated by suspicions of diabolical cunning, inscrutable motives, and international plots using unseen forces of the gigantic, fear-inspiring empire of the tsar. The contributors, leading historians from both Russia and the West, examine Imperial foreign policy from its origins to the October Revolution, revealing a policy that, as in other countries, had a complex of motives - commerce, nationalism, the interests of various social groups - but an unusual origin, coming almost exclusively from the entourage of the tsar. The work is based largely on original research in Soviet archives, which only became possible after Soviet glasnost.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

the traditions of Imperial Russian foreign
1
The imperial heritage of Peter the Great in
21
The role of the Baltic in Russian foreign policy
36
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
75
Runaway peasants and Russian motives for
103
Policy traditions and the Menshikov mission of 1853
119
The personal responsibility of Emperor Nicholas I
159
Russian policy and the United States during
173
The sale of Alaska in the context of RussoAmerican
193
Russias Balkan policies under Alexander II 1855
219
The foreign policy of Russia in the Far East at
247
domestic factors
268
The historiography of Imperial Russian foreign
360
Afterword
445
Index
451
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information