Unbuilt Calgary: A History of the City That Might Have Been

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Dundurn, Nov 3, 2012 - History - 232 pages
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The essence of a vibrant, growing, and changing Calgary is captured over the life of its development.

Calgary is a typical boom-and-bust town that was first based on ranching and farming, then oil and gas, and now energy. And energy is what its citizens have, whether for skiing, work, or construction. It is a city that leaps ahead eagerly to new futures and rarely looks back., but Calgary can also be an unsentimental city, discarding its ideas, plans, and buildings with ease.

Unbuilt Calgary is a survey of 30 projects that were proposed but not realized, schemes that were situated at critical times in Calgary’s development, and proposals that indicated the city’s ambitions through its first 100 years. Unbuilt Calgary looks back to ideas and notions that might have been, and building endeavours that would have changed the shape of the city for better or worse. The 30 critical projects are accompanied by drawings and models to illustrate something of Calgary’s irrepressible exuberance.

 

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Contents

Chapter 24
114
Chapter 25
117
Chapter 26
121
Chapter 27
123
Chapter 28
128
Chapter 29
135
Chapter 30
140
Chapter 31
143

Chapter 7
41
Chapter 8
43
Chapter 9
46
Chapter 10
50
Chapter 11
57
Chapter 12
61
Chapter 13
71
Chapter 14
75
Chapter 15
79
Chapter 16
82
Chapter 17
89
Chapter 18
91
Chapter 19
93
Chapter 20
96
Chapter 21
100
Chapter 22
107
Chapter 23
109
Chapter 32
150
Chapter 33
159
Chapter 34
165
Chapter 35
170
Chapter 36
175
Chapter 37
183
Chapter 38
187
Chapter 39
191
Chapter 40
199
Chapter 41
203
Chapter 42
211
Chapter 43
215
Bibliography
223
Index
226
Of Related Interest
231
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Stephanie White worked as an architect in Calgary at the end of the second oil boom, taught architecture in several U.S. and Canadian universities, and has a Ph.D. in urban geography. She edits and publishes On Site review, a Canadian magazine about architecture and urbanism. She lives in Calgary.

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