Understanding Green Revolutions: Agrarian Change and Development Planning in South Asia

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Cambridge University Press, May 3, 1984 - Social Science - 384 pages
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Peasant societies in the Third World have undergone changes that are often regarded as sweeping and unparalleled; rapid population growth, progressive integration into the market economy and a Green Revolution in agricultural technology. This book is a critical examination of the truth behind these stereotypes. Twenty-one specialists in the field of development studies look at the reality of agrarian change, either through historical analysis, or through in-depth village field-work, or from their experience as development planners. The first four chapters provide the historical context of agrarian change in India, Latin America and pre-industrial Europe. These are followed by eight detailed case studies of the impact of the green Revolution at village level in India, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh. The book finishes with six analysis of the effectiveness of government policies designed to intervene in the development process in South Asia and in East Africa. The contributors to this book share a commitment to an interdisciplinary approach to the study of development problems.
 

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Contents

The agricultural revolution in Western Europe
1
Land reform as a precondition for Green
18
the Green Revolution
37
Agrarian policy and agrarian change
87
Migration and agrarian change in Garhwal
109
Energy flow and agrarian change
153
Income and wealth disparities in a land
173
Agrarian structure and agricultural
194
A structural analysis of two farms
212
Planning and agrarian change in East
270
spatial
280
ideology
315
Environmental hazard and coastal
339
a selective
362
Index
381
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