Principles of Planetary Climate

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Cambridge University Press, Dec 2, 2010 - Science
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This book introduces the reader to all the basic physical building blocks of climate needed to understand the present and past climate of Earth, the climates of Solar System planets, and the climates of extrasolar planets. These building blocks include thermodynamics, infrared radiative transfer, scattering, surface heat transfer and various processes governing the evolution of atmospheric composition. Nearly four hundred problems are supplied to help consolidate the reader's understanding, and to lead the reader towards original research on planetary climate. This textbook is invaluable for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate students in atmospheric science, Earth and planetary science, astrobiology, and physics. It also provides a superb reference text for researchers in these subjects, and is very suitable for academic researchers trained in physics or chemistry who wish to rapidly gain enough background to participate in the excitement of the new research opportunities opening in planetary climate.
 

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Contents

1 The Big Questions
1
2 Thermodynamics in a nutshell
81
3 Elementary models of radiation balance
134
4 Radiative transfer in temperaturestratified atmospheres
187
5 Scattering
316
6 The surface energy balance
386
7 Variation of temperature with season and latitude
432
8 Evolution of the atmosphere
497
9 A peek at dynamics
599
Index
635
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About the author (2010)

Raymond T. Pierrehumbert is the Louis Block Professor in the Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago, where he has taught and undertaken research on a wide variety of Earth and planetary climate problems for over twenty years. He shared in the Nobel Peace Prize as a lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Third Assessment Report. He co-authored the U.S. National Research Council report on Abrupt Climate Change, and is currently on the National Research Council panel on CO2 stabilization targets, as well as being a member of their Board on Atmospheric Science and Climate. He has been a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow, is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, and was named Chevalier de l'Ordre des Palmes Academiques by the Republic of France. In addition to his research on planetary climate, he writes regularly for the popular RealClimate.org climate science blog.

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