Traditions, Legends, Superstitions, and Sketches of Devonshire: On the Borders of the Tamar and the Tavy, Illustrative of Its Manners, Customs, History, Antiquities, Scenery, and Natural History, in a Series of Letters to Robert Southey, Esq

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 178 - The wheels composed of crickets' bones, And daintily made for the nonce ; For fear of rattling on the stones With thistle-down they shod it ; For all her maidens much did fear If Oberon had chanced to hear That Mab his Queen should have been there, He would not have abode it. She mounts her chariot with a trice, Nor would she stay for no advice, Until her maids that were so nice To wait on her were fitted ; But...
Page 178 - Fly Cranion her charioteer Upon the coach-box getting. Her chariot of a snail's fine shell, Which for the colours did excel, The fair Queen Mab becoming well, So lively was the limning ; The seat the soft wool of the bee, The cover, gallantly to see, The wing of a pied butterflee ; I trow 'twas simple trimming. The wheels composed of crickets...
Page 177 - And somewhat southward toward the noon, Whence lies a way up to the moon. And thence the Fairy can as soon Pass to the earth below it. The walls of spiders...
Page 177 - For naught must be her letting; Four nimble gnats the horses were, Their harnesses of gossamer, Fly Cranion her charioteer, Upon the coach-box getting. Her chariot of a snail's fine shell, Which for the colours did excel, The fair queen Mab becoming well, So lively was the limning; The seat...
Page 5 - The west wind always brings wet weather, The east wind wet and cold together, The south wind surely brings us rain, The north wind blows it back again.
Page 178 - For hedge and ditch they spared not, But after her they hie them; A cobweb over them they throw, To shield the wind if it should blow, Themselves they wisely could bestow Lest any should espy them.
Page 190 - ... when she opened her eyes she knew nothing at all about the matter, excepting that Molly was to go lame on her right leg for seven long years, unless a herb with a strange name could be got to cure her. And lame she went for nearly the whole of that period. At length (it was about the end of the time) a merry, squint-eyed, queer-looking boy, started up one fine summer day, just as she went to pluck a mushroom, and came tumbling, head over heels, towards her. He insisted on striking her leg with...
Page 92 - And he defiled Topheth, which is in the valley of the children of Hinnom, that no man might make his son or his daughter to pass through the fire to Molech.
Page 336 - Epiphany, the farmer, attended by his workmen, with a large pitcher of cider, goes to the orchard, and there encircling one of the best bearing trees, they drink the following toast three several times : — ' Here's to thee, old apple-tree, Whence thou mayst bud, and whence thou mayst blow! And whence thou mayst bear apples enow ! Hats full! caps full I Bushel — bushel — sacks full, And my pockets full too ! Huzza...
Page 74 - Cyclop.') The inhabitants, therefore, of Cornwall, as well as Wales, might be called Welch. And in this supposition I am confirmed by Borlase, who states that the Saxons " imposed the name of Weales on the Britons, driven by them west of the rivers Severn and Dee, calling their country, in the Latin tongue, Wallia.

Bibliographic information