Rebel Youth: 1960s Labour Unrest, Young Workers, and New Leftists in English Canada

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UBC Press, Jul 30, 2014 - History - 252 pages

During the "long sixties," baby boomers raised on democratic postwar ideals demanded a more egalitarian society for all. While a few became vocal leaders at universities across Canada, nearly 90% of Canada's young people went straight to work after high school. There, they brought the anti-authoritarian spirit of the youth revolt to the labour movement.

While university-based activists combined youth culture with a new brand of radicalism to form the New Left, young workers were pressing for wildcat strikes and defying their aging union leaders in a wave of renewed militancy. In Rebel Youth, Ian Milligan looks at these converging currents, demonstrating convincingly how they were part of a single youth phenomenon.

With just short of seventy interviews complementing the extensive use of archival records from ten different cities, this book claims a central place for labour and class in the legacy of the Canadian sixties.

 

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Contents

Introduction
3
1 The Challenge of Rebel Youth
12
2 Punching In Walking Out
37
3 Say Goodbye to the Working Class?
65
4 Leaving Campus
91
5 Cold Slogging Solidarity
121
6 A Relationship Culminates
150
Conclusion
172
Notes
184
Selected Bibliography
215
Index
227
Copyright

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About the author (2014)

Ian Milligan is an assistant professor of Canadian and digital history at the University of Waterloo.

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