The Needs of Strangers

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Macmillan, Jun 2, 2001 - Philosophy - 156 pages

This thought provoking book uncovers a crisis in the political imagination, a wide-spread failure to provide the passionate sense of community "in which our need for belonging can be met." Seeking the answers to fundamental questions, Michael Ignatieff writes vividly both about ideas and about the people who tried to live by them—from Augustine to Bosch, from Rosseau to Simone Weil. Incisive and moving,The Needs of Strangers returns philosophy to its proper place, as a guide to the art of being human.

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User Review  - dono421846 - www.librarything.com

Although I found the conclusion anticlimactic, the preceding chapter were full of suggestive insights, drawing upon connections in literature not easily seen to others. The first on Shakespeare's Lear ... Read full review

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About the author (2001)

Michael Ignatieff is a frequent contributor to The New Yorker and The New York Review of Books, among other publications, and the author of many acclaimed books, including Blood and Belonging, Isaiah Berlin, Virtual War, The Warrior's Honor, and The Russian Album. He lives in London and Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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