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OF THE

STATE OF NEW YORK

COMPRISING THE

REVISED STATUTES, AS THEY EXISTED ON THE 1ST DAY OF JULY, 1862,

AND ALL THE

GENERAL PUBLIO STATUTES THEN IN FORCE, WITH REFERENCES TO JUDICIAL DECISIONS, AND THE

MATERIAL NOTES OF THE REVISERS IN THEIR REPORT TO THE LEGISLATURK

EDITED BY

JOHN W. EDMONDS.

IN FIVE VOLUMES.

VOLUME I.

CONTAINING THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES AND THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATB; AN
INTRODUCTION; AN ANALYSIS OF ALL THE STATUTES AND PART FIRST AND CHAP-

TERS 1, 2, 3 AND 4, OF PART SECOND OF THE RE VASED-STATOTES.

PUBLISHED BY
WEARE C. LITTLE, LAW BOOKSELLER,
525 BROADWAY, ALBANY.

1863.

Entered according to act of Congress, in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three,

BY JOHN W. EDMONDS, in the Clerk's office of the district court of the Northern district of New York. The copyright extending

only to introduction, index, notes, order and arrangement.

114801

JUL 13 1938

STATE OF NEW YORK, L. OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE, **.

I, HORATIO BALLARD, Secretary of State, certify that so much of the matter contained in the text of this edition of the Revised Statutes as purports to be a copy thereof, is a correct transcript of the text of the Revised Statutes, as originally published under the authority of the State, except such typographical errors in the original as have been corrected in the copy, and except such parts as have been altered by acts of the legislature, and that with respect to such parts it conforms to the acts by which such alterations have been made.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereto set my signature, at the city of Albany, the 25th day of June, 1863.

HORATIO BALLARD,

Secretary of State.

WIED, PARSONS & COMPANY, PUBLISHERS,

PRINTERS AND STEREOTYPERS,

ALBANY, N. Y.

INTRODUCTION.

I can hardly tell what first prompted me to engage in the work which I have now completed and send forth among my brethren of the profession.

It certainly was not the prospect of pecuniary reward, for I have no hope that I shall ever realize from it anything like an adequate remuneration for the immense labor it has cost — labor involving the perusal of some 45,000 pages of Statute law, about one half of which I have gone over eight or ten times, and the examination of some 25,000 reported cases — half of which I have had to examine twice over.

It as certainly was not the expectation of applause, for I fully realize, in respect to my compilation, Dr. Johnson's remark about his —“Every other author may aspire to praise, the Lexicographer can only hope to escape reproach."

But I suspect it had its origin mostly in my own conviction long entertained — of the justice of Bacon's remark, that “every man is a debtor to his profession, from the which as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves, by way of amends, to be a help and ornament thereunto.”

In my profession I have been so much retarded by the necessity of looking for a statute through some fifty volumes, and most of them having most slovenly indexes, and in searching for adjudications upon them through some two hundred volumes of reported Cases, that it seemed to me that I could render to my brethren of the profession in this State, no more acceptable service, than a condensation of the fifty volumes of Statute law into four or five, and a reference to all the adjudged cases on those Statutes. I have hoped that I could thus save to the profession much toil — by

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