The New Annual Register, Or General Repository of History, Politics, and Literature, for the Year ...

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G. Robinson, Pater-noster-Row, 1818 - English poetry
 

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Page 235 - Say a day, without the ever : No, no, Orlando ; men are April when they woo, December when they wed : maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives.
Page 143 - Majesty that it may be enacted, and be it enacted . . . that whereas by reason of some defects in the law poor people are not restrained from going from one parish to another, and therefore do endeavour to settle themselves in those parishes where there is the best stock, the largest commons or wastes to build cottages, and the most woods for them to burn and destroy...
Page 235 - The very air of the place seems to breathe a spirit of philosophical poetry; to stir the thoughts, to touch the heart with pity, as the drowsy forest rustles to the sighing gale. Never was there such beautiful moralizing, equally free from pedantry or petulance.
Page 131 - The virtue, spirit, and essence of a House of Commons consists in its being the express image of the feelings of the nation. It was not instituted to be a control upon the people, as of late it has been taught, by a doctrine of the most pernicious tendency. It was designed as a control for the people.
Page 232 - How all occasions do inform against me, And spur my dull revenge! What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed? a beast, no more.
Page 230 - Hamlet is a name ; his speeches and sayings but the idle coinage of the poet's brain. What then, are they not real ? They are as real as our own thoughts. Their reality is in the reader's mind. It is <we who are Hamlet.
Page 232 - Of thinking too precisely on th' event, A thought which quarter'd hath but one part wisdom, And ever three parts coward, I do not know Why yet I live to say This thing's to do...
Page 141 - Sally," and kissed him with much fondness and satisfaction. This encouraged him to say, that if it would give her any pleasure, he would make pictures of the flowers which she held in her hand : for...
Page 232 - Excitements of my reason and my blood, And let all sleep ? while, to my shame, I see The imminent death of twenty thousand men, That, for a fantasy and trick of fame, Go to their graves like beds...
Page 114 - ... a convenient stock of flax hemp wool thread iron and other necessary ware and stuff to set the poor on work: and also competent sums of money for and towards the necessary relief of the lame impotent old blind and such other among them being poor and not able to work...

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