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Statement Showing the Wages of Employes in the Liquor Business in

the State of New York as compared with the Wages of Workingmen in Thirty-two Other Principal Industries of the State.

Average for

The following table gives the average annual wages per employe for five years from 1891 to 1895, inclusive, as shown by the report of the Commissioner of the New York Bureau of Statistics of Labor:

Are years. Agricultural implements and machinery......

$448 40 Artisan's tools and cutlery

...... 432 17 Boots and shoes..................

425 46 Brick, sewer pipe, terra cotta, etc.

246 95 Building.......................

474 72 Carpets, oilcloth, etc. ............

372 69 Carriages, wagons and sleighs. ......

518 65 Chemicals, acids, etc. ... ..........

514 10 Cigars, cigarettes and tobacco. ...

391 36 Clocks, watches and jewelry......

630 84 Clothing.......................

576 29 · Cooking and heating apparatus. ...

605 61 Cotton goods. ...............

341 47 Food products. ... ...

412 93 Furniture. ... ...........

493 09 Glass and glass goods. ...

467 47 Gloves and mittens. .....

317 50 Knit goods. ................

312 30 Leather and leather goods. ......

427 73 Liquors (malt and distilled). .....

769 77 Machines, machinery, etc. .......

569 92 Metal and metallic goods. ...........

507 18 Musical instruments and materials. ........

609 79 Oils and illuminating fluids. ... ........ ....... 558 55

.........

248

ANNUAL REPORT OF STATE COMMISSIONER OF EXCISE.

Paints and colors. ...........
Paper and paper goods. ............
Printing, publishing, binding, etc. ......
Railroad construction, repairing, etc. ...
Silk goods. ..........................
Soap, candles and grease. ... ...
Stone, marble, etc. .......
Wooden goods. ... ..........
Woolen and worsted goods. ......

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The average annual wages per employe engaged in the

liquor business for the above period was.............. $769 77 The next highest average annual wages was paid to those

engaged in the jewelry business, viz.................... The average of the annual wages of those who were

engaged during this period in the 32 leading industries

of the State, outside of the liquor business, was....... 466 40 The lowest average annual wages was paid to those

engaged in the brick and terra cotta business, viz...... 246 95

The average annual wages of those engaged in the liquor business during this period was 65 per cent. more than the average of those engaged in the other 32 leading industries; the average liquor wages was 22 per cent. more than the next highest average, viz., those engaged in the jewelry business; it was 86.4 per cent. more than those employed on food products, and 211 per cent. more than the lowest average, viz., those employed in the brick and terra cotta business.

Judging from the foregoing statistics, the liquor business has not been unduly depressed as compared with other industries, but on the contrary has been the most profitable of any, and consequently well able to bear its legitimate share of the expenses of government.

APPENDIX.

THE ORDINANCES AND LAWS

OF THE

Colonies of New Netherland and New York

AND THE

STATE OF NEW YORK,

Relating to the Excise and the Traffic in Intoxicating Liquors, from the

first Ordinance in 1638 to the Liquor Tax Law of 1896.

COLLECTED BY H. H. LYMAN, Commissioner of Excise. With an introduction and references to the Session Laws, on the subject of Excise, prepared

under his supervision by L. E. CHITTENDEN.

The following collection of municipal and State laws comprises the subjects of excise, the regulations of inns, taverns, etc., and the sale by retail of intoxicating liquors, wines, ale, beer and cider. These terms are closely related, and the term “excise” was not comprehensive enough to include them.

The meaning of that term has changed since its first use in legislation. Originally it was a tax imposed on any article of domestic production; now it is understood to cover the regulation and sale of all liquors, wines, etc., foreign as well as domestic, and those only.

The date or time of passage of the ordinance or act is placed in every instance at the head of it.

Omissions are in all cases indicated by stars. These omissions do not relate to the subject of the collection, or cover merely formal words used in all State laws.

In the earlier colonial period it was the custom frequently to reenact the same ordinance. Those imposing or “letting to farm” or “regulating the collection” of the excise were passed annually or biennially, without any or with very slight changes.

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