Essays

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Woodward, 1893 - 319 pages
 

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Page 264 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested : that is, some books are to be read only in parts ; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
Page 10 - Certainly, it is heaven upon earth, to have a man's mind move in charity, rest in providence, and turn upon the poles of truth.
Page 263 - STUDIES serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability. Their chief use for delight, is in privateness and retiring : for ornament, is in discourse ; and for ability, is in the judgment and disposition of business ; for expert men can execute, and perhaps judge of particulars, one by one : but the general counsels, and the plots and marshalling of affairs come best from those that are learned.
Page 144 - But little do men perceive what solitude is, and how far it extendeth. For a crowd is not company ; and faces are but a gallery of pictures; and talk but a tinkling cymbal, where there is no love.
Page 231 - There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion. A man cannot tell whether Apelles or Albert Durer were the more trifler; whereof the one would make a personage by geometrical proportions : the other, by tak1ng the best parts out of divers faces, to make one excellent.
Page 15 - It is as natural to die as to be born; and to a little infant, perhaps, the one is as painful as the other. He that dies in an earnest pursuit, is like one that is wounded in hot blood ; who, for the time, scarce feels the hurt ; and therefore a mind fixed and bent upon somewhat that is good, doth avert the dolours of death ; but, above all, believe it, the sweetest canticle is, '' Nunc dimittis" when a man hath obtained worthy ends and expectations.
Page 185 - It is a shameful and unblessed thing to take the scum of people and wicked condemned men, to be the people with whom you plant ; and not only so, but it spoileth the plantation ; for they will ever live like rogues, and not fall to work, but be lazy, and do mischief, and spend victuals, and be quickly weary, and then certify over to their country to the discredit of the plantation.
Page 58 - But power to do good is the true and lawful end of aspiring; for good thoughts, though God accept them, yet toward men are little better than good dreams, except they be put in act ; and that cannot be without power and place, as the vantage and commanding ground.
Page 145 - ... no receipt openeth the heart but a true friend, to whom you may impart griefs, joys, fears, hopes, suspicions, counsels, and whatsoever lieth upon the heart to oppress it, in a kind of civil shrift or confession.
Page 56 - The rising unto place is laborious, and by pains men come to greater pains; and it is sometimes base, and by indignities men come to dignities. The standing is slippery; and the regress is either a downfall or at least an eclipse, which is a melancholy thing.

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