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The Bureau of Reclamation will complete the plans and specifications for the aqueduct, and the Bureau of Yards and Docks will perform the emergency construction work. You should arrange for cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation during the period when the plans and specifications are being completed in order that the plans and specifications will satisfy your needs. The postwar operation of the project will be under arrangements to be made by the Bureau of Reclamation, with the Navy Department cooperating, and the local interests. You should arrange for cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation in this matter, as well.

The excellent cooperation that has existed among the agencies concerned, I know will be continued. Sincerely yours,

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT. Enclosure.

ance.

EXHIBIT 24

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington 25, D. C., November 29, 1944. Maj. Gen. PHILIP B. FLEMING,

Administrator, Federal Works Agency. MY DEAR GENERAL FLEMING: On October 3 I sent to you a memorandum with regard to the critical water-supply situation in the vicinity of San Diego, Calif. The committee that I referred to has met and has reported to me.

I have approved the report and am attaching a copy of it for your information and guid

I have transmitted the report to the Congress, as well. The Bureau of Reclamation will complete the plans and specifications for the aqueduct, but will require an allocation of Lanham Act funds for the purpose. An allocation of $500,000, or so much thereof as may be necessary, is recommended. I have instructed the Bureau of Reclamation to make application to you for these funds. The Bureau of Yards and Docks will perform the emergency work. The postwar operation of the project will be under arrangements to be made by the Bureau of Reclamation, the Navy Department, and the local interests.

The excellent cooperation that has existed among the agencies concerned, I know will be continued. Sincerely yours,

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT. Enclosure,

EXHIBIT 25

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington 25, D, C., November 29, 1944. Hon. SHERIDAN DOWNEY,

United States Senate. MY DEAR SENATOR DOWNEY: In response to your letter of September 25, I wrote to you on October 3 assuring you that an appropriate committee would study and report to me on the critical situation of the water supply for the city of San Diego and the surrounding areas.

The committee was established, has met and concluded its work, and has reported to me. I have approved the report. For your information I am attaching a copy of the report, which also is being forwarded formally to the Congress.

The Bureau of Reclamation will complete the plans and specifications, and the Bureau of Yards and Docks will undertake the emergency construction.

It will be necessary for the local interests to make satisfactory and equitable arrangements with the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California for the permanent use of the aqueduct. For that reason, the Bureau of Reclamation will continue its relationships with the local interests, and should be pre pared, under the reclamation laws, to arrange for the continued operation and additional construction that will be required. Sincerely yours,

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT. Enclosure.

EXHIBIT 26

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington 25, D. C., November 29, 1944. Mr. PHIL D. SWING,

604 San Diego Trust and Savings Bank, San Diego, Calif. MY DEAR MR. SWING: I have received the report of the committee established to study and report to me on the critical water-supply situation in the vicinity of San Diego, Calif. Since you were the representative on the committee of the San Diego County Water Authority, I am sending through you to the authority a copy of the report, which I have approved.

While the construction of the emergency aqueduct will be undertaken as a Federal project, I have asked the Bureau of Reclamation to continue its relationships with your authority, the city of San Diego, and the county of San Diego. The emergency work will have permanent value and utility to the local community. I have asked the Bureau of Reclamation, with the Navy Department cooperating, to endeavor to make suitable and equitable arrangements with the local interests for the operation of the aqueduct after the war emergency and, in cooperation with local interests, to make the arrangements for the completion of the aqueduct under the reclamation laws when additional capacity is required and satisfactory arrangements have been completed.

Your authority will note that the report expressly recommends that the local interests press negotiations with the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California in order that equiable arrangements may be completed looking toward the continued use of the works. I hope that I may receive assurances that this will be done. Sincerely yours,

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, Enclosure.

EXHIBIT 27

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington 25, D. C., November 29, 1944. Mr. WALTER COOPER,

City Manager, San Diego, Calif. MY DEAR MR. COOPER: I have received the report of the committee established to study and report to me on the critical water-supply situation in the vicinity of San Diego, Calif. I understand that you, as city manager of San Diego, attended all meetings of the committee. I am sending you a copy of the report which I have approved.

While the construction of the emergency aqueduct will be undertaken as a Federal project, I have asked the Bureau of Reclamation to continue its relationships with the city of San Diego, the county of San Diego, and the San Diego County Water Authority. The emergency work will have permanent value and utility to the local community. I have asked the Bureau of Reclamation, with the Navy Department cooperating to endeavor to make suitable and equitable arrangements with the local interests for the operation of the aqueduct after the war emergency and, in cooperation with local interests, to make arrangements for the completion of the aqueduct under the reclamation laws when additional capacity is required and satisfactory arrangements have been completed.

The city of San Diego should note that the report expressly recommends that the local interests press negotiations with the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California in order that equitable arrangements may be completed looking toward the continued use of the works. I hope that I may receive assurances that this will be done. Sincerely yours,

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT. Enclosure.

EXHIBIT 28

THE WHITE HOUSE,

Washington 25, D. C., November 29, 1944. Mr. WILLIAM E. WARNE, Assistant Commissioner, Bureau of Reclamation,

Washington 25, D. C. MY DEAR MR. WARNE: I have received the report of your committee on the problems presented by the critical water supply situation in the vicinity of San Diego, Calif., and I approve it.

I want to thank you and the other committee members for expedtious and competent handling of this matter. Sincerely yours,

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT.

EXHIBIT 29

10-day reports on San Diego reservoir storage as required by Office of War

Mobilization and Reconversion

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The CHAIRMAN. We will recess until 2 o'clock this afternoon.

(Whereupon, at 12:30 p. m., a recess was taken until 2 p. m., this day.

AFTERNOON SESSION (Pursuant to recess, the committee reconvened at 2 o'clock p. m.)

The CHAIRMAN. I think we might as well resume this hearing. The other members of the committee will be along shortly, but time seems to be of value.

The next witness scheduled is Mayor Knox. Is Mayor Knox in thg room?

(Mayor Knox came forward and took the witness stand.).
The CHAIRMAN. You name is Harley E. Knox, mayor of San Diego?
Mayor Knox. Yes, sir.
The CHAIRMAN. Can you summarize your testimony?

Mayor Knox. Yes, Mr. Chairman. I have prepared a brief, and it has previously been submitted, and I should like to ask that it be made a part of the record.

The CHAIRMAN. Yes; that may be done. Mayor Knox. And then, I should like to talk in an attempt to possibly

The CHAIRMAN (interposing). We will put in what we can of the exhibits.

Mayor Knox. Very well, sir.

The CHAIRMAN. There may be some of them that will not reproduce, but we will try to get the material in the record anyway, and the charts as far as possible to do so.

(The papers referred to follow :)

STATEMENT IN SUPPORT OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE SAN DIEGO AQUEDUCT PRE

SENTED IN BEHALF OF THE CITY OF SAN DIEGO TO THE COMMITTEE ON EXPENDITURES IN EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS OF THE UNITED STATES SENATE BY THE MAYOR OF SAN DIEGO AS REPRESENTATIVE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF SAN DIEGO

The city of San Diego is here represented not to question in any detail the legality of the Comptroller General's opinion alleging illegal use of Federal funds appropriated for construction of San Diego aqueduct by the Navy.

The Congress, regardless of the final decision with reference to the legality of the various and complicated procedures taken to date to bring the San Diego aqueduct to its present state of construction, is empowered to deal with this matter in equity and in justice. And it is for this reason that the city of San Diego is here represented to give full information to this Senate committee concerning this matter.

The people of San Diego, under their civil powers and without any support from the United States Government, had, in 1939, with forethought and vision, provided themselves with a water supply adequate for 712 years of drought, which is comparable to the worst dry period that San Diego had experienced in the previous 80 years.

With the declaration of a state of emergency by the President and the subsequent national defense program of 1940, San Diego's industries and military installations began to mushroom and grow to spectacular proportions far beyond normal expectations.

The unexpected drain on San Diego's water storage, with the preparation for and prosecution of the war, is best illustrated by the percentage of water used by Federal Government activities, as illustrated by the following figures: Percent

Percent 1940. 10.91944_

43.0 1941. 17.5 | 1945_

43. 3 1942 28. 4 | 1946_

35.9 1943_

40.3 It should be emphasized that nongovernmental use of water in the city of San Diego today is still below the planned net safe yield of a water system that was built and financed without any Government assistance. This is illustrated in the attached graph (exhibit A), which graphically demonstrates that San Diego's water problems are the immediate result of the impoverishment of its supply by the expanded war use of stored water.

The citizens of San Diego, in 1941, began to look with alarm upon the use of water for all of these unexpected governmental purposes, which was far exceeding the net safe yield of the city's reservoirs. Therefore, the citizens, by an overwhelmingly majority vote, authorized immediately construction of another large reservoir, designed to add 5.3 million gallons of daily net safe yield of water to the overburdened system. The cost of this construction was assumed entirely by the citizens of San Diego in a patriotic effort to provide water for prosecution

The city's hydraulic engineers, in: 1941, had emphasized that a study of rainfall records over the previous 80 years indicated approach of a cycle of long drought, and warned that the city should begin to anticipate the necessity of preliminary studies leading to the importation from watersheds other than local. This meant that the city would now be faced with using its Colorado River water rights, acquired in 1933 under contract with the Secretary of the Interior. It had been anticipated that the use of the Colorado River rights would not be normally required by San Diego until about 1965.

In accordance with the recommendations of the hydraulic engineers, San Diego City and County contracted, in May 1943, with the Bureau of Reclamation for an engineering study and survey to determine the most feasible and economical route by which Colorado River water might be made available to the San Diego area.

Because of manpower shortage, these surveys necessarily progressed slowly. In early 1944, faced with official advice that we were fighting a long war, the city and county of San Diego, through their official Representatives in Congress, asked the President of the United States to appoint a commission to study what appeared to be an impending emergency in water supply,

The President, in a letter addressed to the Assistant Commissioner of the Bureau of Reclamation under date of October 3, 1944, directed that an inter

of the war.

departmental committee be formed and that definite recommendations be made on the following specific points :

(1) The extent of Federal and local participation in the financing of the construction proposed.

(2) The extent to which the additional facilities are required as a result of Federal activities in connection with the prosecution of the war.

(3) The source of Federal funds for the work. (4) The existing laws under which the development might be authorized. (5) Additional legislation which might be required.

(6) Any other matters relating to the subject which the committee may deem pertinent.

The committee, in its report back to the President (a matter of record on file with the Congress) on October 21, 1944, found that an emergency existed and made certain recommendations, as follows:

“(1) The extent of the Federal participation in the construction proposed to meet the emergency is 100 percent.

“(2) The facilities are required as a result of Federal activities in connection with the prosecution of the war. The extent of the requirement is disclosed in finding No. 3.

“(3) The Federal funds for the work should be supplied by the War Department, the Navy Department, and the Federal Works Agency.

“(4) The laws under which the development is authorized include the First War Powers Act of 1941, the Lanham Act, and the laws relating to Army and Navy construction and Army and Navy Appropriation Acts.

"(5) There would be no additional legislation required to undertake the proposed construction during the war emergency. The Federal reclamation laws contain sufficient authority for the Bureau of Reclamation, in cooperation with the San Diego County Water Authority, or the city of San Diego, to complete the aqueduct to its ultimate required capacity after the war when the needs develop and satisfactory arrangements have been completed.

*(6) While you have designated the Bureau of Reclamation as the construction agency, the committee wishes to point out that there are four Federal agencies competent to undertake the emergency construction. They are the Bureau of Yards and Docks, Navy Department; the Corps of Engineers, War Department; the Federal Works Agency; and the Bureau of Reclamation. The committee believes that you may wish to place the construction of the emergency project in the hands of the Bureau of Yards and Docks since it represents the Federal agency with the greatest and most pressing need, and since the construction would be undertaken as a Federal project without repayment contracts previously entered with local interests. In any event, the committee recmmends that the Bureau of Reclamation complete the plans and specifications for the aqueduct over route 1 with funds made available immediately from the Lanham Act appropriations to the Federal Works Agency, and that the plans and specifications be completed at the earliest possible time, to be made available as completed to the Bureau of Yards and Docks, if the latter is to construct the emergency project. The committee recommends that the War Department and the Navy Department cooperate with the Bureau of Reclamation as may be required in the completion of the engineering work preparatory to construction. The commitee recommends that the Bureau of Reclamation continue its present relationship with the local agencies in order that work already begun may be completed preparatory to providing a permanent solution to the water-supply problem of the area. The committee recommends that the San Diego County Water Authority or the city of San Diego continue and press negotiations with the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California to the end that an equitable arrangement be worked out which would make possible permanent service by way of route 1 in order that the value and permanent utility of the emergency work be realized, and to protect against the possibility of an interruption in the supplemental water supply on the termination of the war emergency. It may be necessary for agencies of interest of the Federal Government to participate in these negotiations.”

The President of the United States, November 29, 1944, in a letter addressed to the Vice President of the United States, acknowledged the impending emergency and issued a directive approving the recommendations of the interdepartmental committee and instructed “that the emergency be met in keeping with the report.”

The President's directive is particularly interesting in view of his long-range and sympathetic understanding concerning the future of the development of

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