Montessori Children

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Contents

I
iv
II
13
III
26
IV
39
V
54
VI
67
VII
81
VIII
94
IX
108
X
119
XI
135
XII
148
XIII
163
XIV
176
Copyright

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Page 155 - All this is a part of education for independence. We habitually serve children; and this is not only an act of servility toward them, but it is dangerous, since it tends to suffocate their useful, spontaneous activity. We are inclined to believe that children are like puppets, and we wash them and feed them as if they were dolls. We do not stop to think that the child who does not do, does not know how to do. He must, nevertheless...
Page 156 - ... such useful acts as nature intended he should perform for himself. The mother who feeds her child without making the least effort to teach him to hold the spoon for himself and to try to find his mouth with it, and who does not at least eat herself, inviting the child to look and see how she does it, is not a good mother. She offends the fundamental human dignity of her son, — she treats him as if he were a doll, when he is, instead, a man confided by nature to her care.
Page 190 - Squirrel-Cage, Hillsboro People, etc. A MONTESSORI MOTHER Illustrated, 8th printing, $1.25 net This authoritative book, by a trained writer who has been most intimately associated with Dr. Montessori, tells just what American mothers, and most teachers, want to know about this system. A simple, untechnical account of the apparatus, the method of its application, and a clear statement of the principles underlying its use. "Fascinating reading and likely to be the most interesting to the average mother...
Page 75 - Your child struggles to educate himself through his senses as did Mario. You, too, perhaps, not seeing the inspiration in the active little fingers, say, " He gets into mischief all the time.
Page 98 - Home-training, the public schools do not develop character. Dr. Montessori tells us that this is because parents and teachers do not know what will, fundamentally, is. Dr. Montessori says,
Page 156 - ... carrying on these various activities, and with the intellectual means for learning how to do them. And our duty toward him is, in every case, that of helping him to make a conquest of such useful acts as nature intended he should perform for himself. The mother who feeds her child without making the least effort to teach him to hold the spoon for himself and to try to find his mouth with it, and who does not at least eat herself, inviting the child to look and see how she does it, is not a good...
Page 79 - The greatest thing we can do for a child is to so educate it that it knows its environment and can adjust itself to social conditions. We do this when we teach our children to see, to hear, to touch intelligently.
Page 60 - ... means to give him a chance to exercise his conscience. It is a new sort of sense-training that means his finding the three R's of the life of the spirit: faith, hope, and charity. How shall we help a child to exercise and train his conscience sense?
Page 156 - Montessori school that may not be practiced in any home. The Montessori schoolroom is a working duplicate of the best conditions which should exist in every home where there is a baby.
Page 80 - If we catch it, then, and turn it into channels of knowledge, we may develop a Marconi, conqueror of space; a Rodin, conqueror of form ; a Burbank, conqueror of life — a Carrel, conqueror of death.

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