RiverTime: Ecotravel on the World's Rivers

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SUNY Press, Mar 20, 2008 - Travel - 302 pages
Journeys on the world’s rivers, from a naturalist’s point of view.

In this engaging travelogue of our world’s rivers, great and small, poet and biologist Mary A. Hood reflects on rivers as creators of place. Recounting her journeys along portions of the Mississippi, the Danube, the Amazon, the Yangtze, the Ganges, the Nile, and a dozen small U.S. rivers, Hood weaves together natural history, current environmental and conservation issues, encounters with endangered plants and animals, and tells some interesting tales along the way.

Like a river, the book begins small, with essays that are narrowly focused on themes of environment and place, such as the need to write our world (Three Rivers), how fires (and corporations) control the West (the Flathead), the effect of wind farms on a small town in western New York (the Conhocton), the giant redwoods and how they were preserved (the Klamath), and the search for moose in the great north woods (the Penobscot). The second section expands the themes of environment and place and looks at great world rivers, their long histories, their biological diversity, the effects of human use and tourism, and the paradox of human reverence and destruction. From endangered species to invasive species, from corporate control of national parks to wind farms, from urban sprawl to efforts at conservation and restoration, RiverTime offers insights into our relationship to the environment in the twenty-first century.

Mary A. Hood is Professor Emerita of Biology at the University of West Florida. She is the author of The Strangler Fig and Other Tales: Field Notes of a Conservationist.
 

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Contents

PART II THE AMAZON
99
PART III OTHER GREAT WORLD RIVERS
159
Conclusion
247

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Page 8 - At the end of the last ice age, about 10,000 years ago, the climate was wetter and there was water in the large lake.

About the author (2008)

Mary A. Hood is Professor Emerita of Biology at the University of West Florida. She is the author of The Strangler Fig and Other Tales: Field Notes of a Conservationist.

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