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5 DIVINITY AVENUE CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS

TO

HIS DEAR MOTHER

THE CONSTANT COMPANION OF MANY ROMAN WINTERS

THESE PAGES ARE DEDICATED

BY

THE AUTHOR

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WALKS IN ROME

INTRODUCTORY

THE ARRIVAL IN ROME

AGE
GAIN this date of Rome; the most solemn and interesting

that my hand can ever write, and even now more interesting than when I saw it last,' wrote Dr. Arnold to his wife in 1840,-and how many thousands before and since have experienced the same feeling, who have looked forward to a visit to Rome as one of the great events of their lives, as the realisation of the dreams and longings of many years !

An arrival in Rome is very different to that in any other town in Europe. It is coming to a place new and yet most familiar, strange and yet so well known. When travellers arrive at Verona, for instance, or at Arles, they generally go to the amphitheatres with a curiosity to know what they are like ; but when they arrive at Rome and go to the Coliseum, it is to visit an object whose appearance has been familiar to them from childhood, and, long ere it is reached, from the heights of the distant Capitol they can recognise the well-known form ;—and as regards S. Peter's, who is not familiar with the aspect of the dome, of the wide-spreading piazza, and the foaming fountains, for long years before they come to gaze upon the reality ?

"My presentiment of the emotions with which I should behold the Roman ruins has proved quite correct,' wrote Niebuhr. Nothing about them is new to me ; as a child I lay so often, for hours together, before their pictures, that their images were, even at that early age, as distinctly impressed upon my mind as if I had actually seen them.'

'Je ne saurais revoir,' says Montaigne, si souvent le tombeau de cette ville si grande et si puissante, que je ne l'admire et révère. J'ai eu connaissance des affaires de Rome long temps avant que j'aie eu connaissance de ma maison. Je savais le Capitole et son plan avant que je susse le Louvre, et le Tibre avant la Seine.'

What Madame Swetchine says of life, that you find in it exactly what you put into it, is also true of Rome, and those who come to

VOL. I.

A

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