How NASA Learned to Fly in Space: An Exciting Account of the Gemini Missions

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Apogee Books, 2004 - Science - 288 pages
NASA learned to fly in space in a time when the agency was young and lean, and had an explicit mandate of staggering audacity set against a tight deadline; in a time when the agency readily accepted risk, and made momentous decisions 'on the run'; in a time when a rendezvous was a major objective of a mission, in a time when opening the hatch and ......

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User Review  - tungsten_peerts - LibraryThing

Normally I'd give an author flak for using the phrase 'exciting story' in his own subtitle, but with the book under consideration I'm inclined to give David Harland a pass because 1) the story told ... Read full review

Contents

Authors preface
7
Acknowledgements
8
Space Race
21
Copyright

13 other sections not shown

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About the author (2004)

\David M. Harland is a space historian and the author of Exploring The Moon: The Apollo Expeditions, The Story of the Space Shuttle, and The Story of the Space Station Mir.

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