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C. Lalins, Lord Viscount Lonsdale, deceafed."
Sp. Lartius, Welbore Ellis, Efq;

L. Lentulus, Henry Legge, Efq;

Licinius Menenius, Lord Limerick.

C. Licinius Nerva, Daniel Leighton, Efq;
C. Livius Salinator, Dr George Lee.
Sp. Lucretius, Randle Wilbraham, Efq;

L. Lucretius Flavus, Sir Richard Lloyd, now
Sol citor General.

C. Lutatius Adm Warren, deceased.
Dec. Magius, Sanuel Martin, Efq; (Efq;
Mamercus Æmilius, Rt lou. George Dodington,
Mamilies Octavius, tloratio Walpole fen. Efq;
Manius Acilius Glabrio, Marthal Wade, deceated.
Manius Tullius, Col. Henry Conway.
Manius Valerius, Col. George Townshend.
T. Manlis Torquatus, Sir John Mordaunt.
Cn. Manlius Vuljo, Sir Watkin Williams Wynne,

deceased.

C. Marcius Coriolanus, Thomas Carew, Efq;
2. Marcius Philippus, Marquis of Tweeddale.
Marius Statilius, Sir John Strange, Matter of
the Rolls, deceased.

Mecenas, George, now Sir George Lyttelton.
Q. Minucius Rufus, Robert More, Efq;
2. Mucius, Hon. William Murray, Efq; now
Attorney-General.

(Led.

C. Mucius Scævola, Earl of Scarborough, decea-
L. Mummius, Earl of Morton.
L. Murena, John Morton, Efq;
A. Nonius, William Northey, Efq;
Cn. Norbanus, Norreys Bertie, Efq;

T. Numifius Prifcus, William Noel, Efq;
C. Numiftus, Robert Nugent, Efq;
L. Numitorius, Sir Roger Newdigate. (Oxford.
T. Otacilius Craffus, Dr Secker, Lord Bifhop of
Cn Olavius, Robert Harley, Efq; afterwards
Earl of Oxford, deceased.

M. Ogulnius, Gen. James Oglethorpe.
2. Opimius, james Ofwald, Efq;
Opiter Virginius, Sir Francis Dashwood.
C. Oppius, Lord Onflow, deceafed.

L. Oppius Salinator, Arthur Onflow, Efq; Speaker of the houfe of Commons.

L. Papirius Curfor, Nicholas Fazakerley, Efq;
T. Pedonius, Peregrine Poulett, Efq;
C. Petillius, Henry Penton, Efq;

L. Pinarius, Thomas Pitt, Efq;

L. Pifo, Earl of Chefterfield.

(Hardwicke.

C. Plinius Cæcilius, Lord Chancellor, and Earl of

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L. Quintius Capitolinus, John Talbot, Efq;
L. Quintius Cincinnatus, William Shippen, Efq;
T. Remilias, Matthew Ridley, Efq; (deceased.
Sp. Rutilius Crafts, Lord Raymond.
C. Sallonius, Lord George Sackville.
Q Sallonius Sarra, Dr Sherlock, Lord Bishop
of Salisbury, now of London.

C. Salluftins Crifpus, Horatio Walpole jun. Esq; Scipio Africanus, Lord Noel Somerfet, now Duke of Beaufort.

A. Sellius, Major Selwyn, deccafed.

A. Sempronius Atratinus, John Selwyn jun. Efq; T. Sempronius Gracchus, Lord Percival, now Earl of Egmont.

P. Sempronius Tuditanus, Sir Thomas Lumley
Saunderfon, late Earl of Scarborough.

L. Sergius Fidenas, Sir John St Aubin, deceased.
Servilius Prifcus, Henry Pelham, Efq; deccafed.
Servius Sulpicius, Sir George Lee.
Sextus Tarqu nius, Robert Nugent, Efq;
T. Sicinius, Humphrey Sydenham, Efq;
T. Statius, Earl of Stanhope.

L Sterinius, Sir William Stanhope.
C. Sulpicius, Edward Southwell, Efq; deceased.
L. Tarquinius Collatinus, Sir Charles Mordaunt.
A. Terentius Varro, Dr Maddox, Lord Bishop of
Worcester.

Titus Pomponius, Penyston Powney, Efq;

Lart. Tolumnis, Sir Edmund Thomas.
C. Trebonius, George Townshend, Efq;
L. Trebonius Alper, Charles Townshend, Esq;
C. Triarius, Robert Tracey, Elq;
M. Tullius Cicero, Sir Robert Walpole, after-
wards Earl of Orford, deceased.
M. Valerius Corvus, Sir John Barnard.

L. Valerius Flaccus, Sir William Yonge, deceased.
Valerius Lavinus, Thomas Winnington, Efq; dec.
P. Valerius Publicola, Walter Plumer, Etq; de-
P. Ventidius, Earl of Weftmorland. (ceafed
T. Veturius Geminus, James Weft, Efq;
L. Veturius Philo, Robert Vyner, Elq;
T. Vetufius, Adm. Vernon.

T.Villius Toptulus. Mr Ald. Willimot, deceased.
L. Virginius, Earl of Hillborough

T. Virginius Rutulus, Thomas Whichcote, Efq; L. Volumnius, Edmund Waller fenior, Efq;

THE

SCOTS MAGAZINE.

JANUARY,

1755.

CONT

HISTORY. A fummary or recapitulation of the public affairs of last year 1.-17.

-An account of the Dutch furprising the island of Madura and the affecting cafe of its King 17. -Naval preparations in Britain 45,6. Pro clamations for encouraging volunteer-feamen, and for calling home all feafaring British fub jects now in foreign fervice ib. The troops,

. fail for Virg nia 46. An Irish lottery difcharged is. A fhip condemned for exporting Irish woollen goods 47. Premiums given for drawings ib. An inftance of generofity at the lying-in hofpital ib. Mr Cholmley's whimfical will ib.

-An account of the Glasgow friendly fociety! 47. Nicol Brown's trial 48. The fpring cir cuit.feflions ib. The rife and progress of the Aberdeen infirmary 49.

MEDICINE. An account of the weather and reigning difeafes 19. and of an extraordinary alimentary powder 20. The lofs of the tibia cured without lameness 33.

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE, two noted inftances of the uncertainty of it 29. &c.

E N T $.

POLITICS. Speeches in the debate on the EastIndia company's mutiny bill, by T. Sempronius Gracchus 21. and Quintus Mucius 27. HERCULANEUM, Paderni's further accounts of difcoveries there 35.

MAN, the design of a new paper fo called 37. Sir I. NEWTON on the ancient year 40 POETRY. To William Lyttelton, Efq; on his being appointed Governor of South Carolina 43. On Clariffa ib. Verfes by a nearfighted gentleman, occafioned by reading Mr Blacklock's poems 44. Lyroclaftes, an elegy on a bafs viol 45. To a miferib. An ode to Spring ib. On R. Cofway's gaining the drawing prize 47.

LISTS, TABLES, &c. The Edinburgh infirmary table for laft year 50, 1. The quantity and value of linen ftamped in Scotland for fale laft year 51. A general table of the Aberdeen infirmary 52. Marriages, Births, Deaths, and Preferments 52, 3. Prices of stocks, grain, and meal 53, 4. Mortality bills for Edinburgh and London 54. New Books and Prints, with extracts, remarks, and the prices 54, 5.6.

A fummary or recapitulation of the PUBLIC AFFAIRS of the year 1754

P

ERSIA continues to be miferably ravaged and depopulated by all the calamities of civil wars, which have now been carried on, with great keennefs and animofity, almoft without interruption, for above seven years paft, fince the death of the late famous Kouli Kan. For fome time perfons who were, or pretended to be his near relations, laid claim to the fucceffion, and had fcarcely any other rivals. Several of them obtained the name of Shah, but without any peaceable reign, one being tumbled from the throne by another, and the latter, after VOL. XVII.

a fhort ftruggle, being difpoffeffed by a third, who was again foon obliged to yield to fuperior force. Mean while the Turks privately encouraged Prince Heraclius, fon of Tirberi Mirza, sovereign of Georgia, but tributary to the Grand Signior, to make an attempt upon Perfia, not wifhing that he fhould obtain the crown, but only imbarrass and weaken a people who not long before had fpread terror through the Ottoman empire. Pr. Heraclius fo artfully managed matters, particularly by declaring that he pretended to no more than to be the protector of the Perfians till they could A

fix

fix upon a monarch of their own nation, as gained the hearts of the people, and gradually drew to him fo numerous an army as enabled him to approach Ifpahan, the capital; upon which Shah Doub, the relation of Kouli Kan then clothed with that title, thought fit to retire to the mountains. The Turks, now become jealous of that prince's fuccefs, fent to Bagdat one whom they had long given out to be a grandfon of Shah Huffein, the laft of the ancient race of Sophis, who they faid had been a refugee in the Ottoman dominions, that he might fet up his claim to the Perfian throne. Early in 1753 Pr. Heraclius pulled off the mafk, laid down the title of protect or, made a triumphant entry into Ifpahan, where he talked in the ftyle of a conqueror, and was proclaimed Sophi. This conduct loft him the affections of the natives, which had been his chief fupport; and fo his army foon decreafed. Notwithstanding that, we had information of his having afterwards defeated Shah Doub in a bloody battle, and obliged him to retire dangerously wounded to Indoftan, fince which time there have been no accounts concerning him. But notice foon arrived of Heraclius being still more upon the decline. Nothing further was heard concerning the pretended heir of the ancient Sophis, whom the Turks had fent to Bagdat, till laft year, when we were given to underftand he had not fucceeded in that character; that upon this he had appeared in feveral other forms in Perfia; and at length affumed the name of Shah Sultan Huffein, faid he was returned from Ruffia, where he had lain concealed, and pretended to be a fon of the late Kouli Kan. About the fame time advice arrived, that Karini Kan, who governed at Ifpahan after Heraclius left it, had been twice defeated by Azad Kan, an Ophgoon; and that the latter had declared himself in favour of Shah Sultan Huffein. Next we had fucceffive ac. counts of Pr Heraclius being totally defeated by Shah Mahmod, King of the Agwans; and of the former having, in his turn, gained a victory over three Kans who had leagued against him.

According to lateft letters received laft year, Azad Kan had twice proved victorious over Kerim Kan, one of the then principal competitors for the throne, upon which the former had Ifpahan delivered to him. It does not appear that he had by that time any intention to fupport the pretenfions of Shah Sultan Huffein, but rather to fet up for himself; as we were told that he had appointed a viceroy to govern in the capital, who acted with great mildness, and was preparing the palaces for his master's reception.

It is well known, that the OTTOMAN PORTE has for a confiderable time had a clofe connection with the courts of Versailles, Stockholm, and Berlin, that she is confidered as one of their conftant allies, and that they are generally reckoned to have great influence over her counfels. The Grand Signior himself, now well advanced in years, has fhewn a ftrong inclination for peace ever fince the late unfuccessful war with Perfia. But his nephew, Sultan Ibrahim, who has been declared heir-apparent to the throne, and is of an enterprifing and martial genius, has a powerful party in the divan, which, with the affiftance of popular infurrections, and the clamours and mutinies of the janifaries, can oblige his Sublime Highness to declare war against any of the Chriftian powers in his neighbourhood, whenever the schemes of France and her allies fhall require it; all which he knows fo well, as to yield to fuch measures as are neceffary to his own fecurity and repofe. In confequence of this, it has been the conftant practice for fome years paft, to put the Turkish troops in motion, to change and augment certain garrifons, to talk of incampments, and to affect a clofe correfpondence with the French and-Swedifh ambaffadors, which, according to the general opinion, was all intended to keep the courts of Vienna and Petersburg in awe, by fhewing how ready the Porte was to act, fo foon as the fituation of affairs fhould render it requifite. Early laft fpring the fame game was again begun to be played; and about the middle of June the Ottoman forces on the fron

tiers of Ruffia fuddenly appeared in motion, when a body of 25,000 men incamped under the cannon of Oczakow, 15,000 at Choczim, and as many at Bender. When the reasons of this conduct were demanded by the powers who judged themselves moft immediately interested in the confequences of it, affurances were given, as had formerly been, of the Porte's pacific difpofition; and the minifters of those powers were told, that the troops had marched from the provinces bordering upon the Black fea, only on account of the scarcity of provifions and forage there; and that their commanders were ordered to take care that nothing fhould be done which might give the leaft umbrage to the neighbouring ftates. Notwithstanding fuch smooth talk, this behaviour hindered the Ruffians from marching fome troops out of that quarter, to another for which they were defigned. Much about this time it was debated in the divan, whether the Turks fhould lay hold on the prefent conjuncture, in order to annex fome provinces of the Perfian empire to that of the Ottomans? but it was carried in the negative, and the honour of this moderation afcribed to the equity of the Grand Signior, who would not, during the confufions of his neighbours, endeavour to recover what had been ceded by treaty. And indeed, confidering the ambition, covetousness, and resentment of mankind in general, there seems to be a neceffity of acknowledging, either that there has been a more than common regard to public faith in the prefent cafe, or, which from other circumstances is as likely, that it has been very strong influence of another kind, which has hindered the Ottomans from embracing fo favourable an opportunity, for attempting to make reprisals upon the Perfians, who, under the late Kouli Kan, treated them fo roughly, and wrested from them fome territories of which they had been in poffeffion. This point being fettled, we were next informed, that fome Turkith forces were affembling towards the frontiers of Poland; where they could either remain, or file off for Tranfylvania, Hungary, or the Ukraine, as might

best fuit the views of their court. The probable reafon for drawing them together on that fide may afterward be taken notice of.

Several violent fhocks of earthquakes were felt in different parts of the Ottoman empire during the last year, particularly one along the coaft of the Morea, on the 15th of July, which, befides other damages, fwallowed up nine populous villages, and killed a great number of people and cattle: a great many through the month of September, and one in October, at Conftantinople; which demolished public and private buildings in different quarters of the city; rendered the Grand Signior's palaces for the most part uninhabitable; laid a whole fine fuburb quite in ruins; threw down four towers of the famous caftle of the Seven Towers; which must have been particularly alarming, if what we have been told concerning the tradition among the Turks be true, that when these seven towers are deftroyed, their empire is near an end; and killed between 3 and 4000 people: one in Armenia on the 2d of September, the fame day that the first happened at Conftantinople, which entirely fwallowed up a large city in that province, converting the place where it flood into a lake of water: and fome terrible ones at Grand Cairo in Egypt in September, which laid at least two thirds of that city, one of the largest and most populous in the world, in ruins, and, according to our latest information, buried about 40,000 people under them. Some tell us, that these awful events have for the prefent effectually tamed the restlefs fpirits of people who were defirous of a war at all events, for the glory, as they called it, of the Ottoman empire; but how long fuch a difpofition, if real, will last, is very uncertain.

His POLISH Majefty, accompanied by the Princes Xavier and Charles, his fons, arrived from Drefden at Warsaw on the 23d of June laft, in order to hold a general diet of the kingdom of Poland. His firft cares were employed in endeavouring to reftore a good understanding between the grandees, and terminate

the

the differences which had for fome years divided the clergy and the civil courts; in both which he was faid to have confiderable fuccefs. In the univerfalia which were published about the begin. ning of Auguft, for convening the diet on the 30th of September, his Majefty declared, that the fecurity of the state, the augmentation of its forces, improvements in domestic economy, and the abolition of fuch abufes as had crept in to the administration of justice, had been the great and important points which he had always recommended to the diets, without receiving the confolation to fee any of his efforts for the public good prove in the leaft fuccefsful; that he would propofe nothing to the then enfuing one but matters of general utility; and that all regard to the private intereft of his own family fhould be excluded. He concluded with fignifying his wishes, that the nuncios would make use of their freedom of voting to raife their drooping country, and not further to deprefs it; that they would lofe no time in vain debates about matters fubject to controverfy; but that, according to ancient custom, and as he had recommended to them in former univerfalia, they would refer to a future diet fuch affairs as they might not be able to determine in this. A good many of the previous dietines broke up without chufing deputies, which ufes to be a bad prognostic of peaceable measures afterward; and in fome places the difputes ran fo high as to end in wounds, and even death. The general diet being opened, on the day appointed, with the ufual ceremonies, the Marfhal of the preceding diet, in quality of director of the chamber, exhorted the affembly to chufe a Marfhal to the prefent one. But the nuncio of Wilkomitz ftood up, and defired, that, previous to all other matters, he might be allowed to speak of certain affairs in which the intereft of the state was concerned. This motion produced long and turbulent debates, which lafted from meeting to meeting till the 23d of October, without its being poffible to bring the election of a Marshal upon the tapis. That day a ftop was put to their activity, by

the retiring of the nuncio of Starodub in Lithuania, after protesting against any future deliberations. He grounded his proteft on the affair of the ordination of Oftrog; and befides complained, that the court-party in the diet had attempted to change the form and method of voting, and had in other refpects acted contrary to the fundamental laws and conftitutions of the republic. Endeavours were used to find and bring him back on the 24th; but he had gone off. Some contended, that the retiring of this nuncio could have no effect, as being contrary to his inftructions from his conftituents; but fo fond were the many of retaining that power by which every nuncio can put a stop to all proceedings when he pleases, that they abfolutely refused to do any thing without him. The director therefore difmiffed the affembly on the 25th, by a speech, which he concluded with recommending the republic to divine Providence, as its only protection and refource, after having loft all hopes of human affiftance. Thus this diet broke up as fruitlessly as many fucceffive preceding ones had, as they did no one thing, except the chufing of Count Potocki Marshal of the tribunal of Petricow.

An account of the ordination of Oftrog was lately published, which we shall give entire, as follows. " Oftrog is the capital of a canton in Volhinia, a palatinate of Poland, fituated at the extremity of the kingdom towards Mofcow. The frequent incurfions of the Tartars in former times, obliged the Poles to concert certain regulations with the inhabitants of that canton, for the fecurity of the country; and it was then the ordination, as it is called, was formed. Certain lands were fet apart, whofe produce or revenue was appointed and appropriated to defray the expence of the crown-troops, who were to repel or ftop the incurfions of the Tartars. The Palatine of Volhinia had the dire&ion of this affair, and applied the money according to the fpirit of the inftitution.

-The Tartars having ceafed their incurfions into Volhinia, and even fought the friendship of the Poles, the ordination

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