How Great the Triumph: James Burnham, Anticommunism, and the Conservative Movement

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University Press of America, 1992 - Biography & Autobiography - 181 pages
James Burnham began his intellectual career in the 1930s as a Trotskyist. However, world events and his personal experiences within the Trotskyist movement convinced him that all forms of Marxism must be totalitarian, and he left the world of Marxism in 1940. This book focuses especially upon Mr. Burnham's career as a senior editor with William F. Buckley, Jr.'s National Review, putting him within the context of the conservative intellectual movement as a whole. Burnham, despite what he called his 'hard' anticommunist public stance, served as a moderating pragmatic force within National Review and American conservatism. He urged fellow conservatives to accept a minimum welfare state, to work within the established two-party system, and to adopt a tough but realistic foreign policy. Contents: From Left to ?; Lenin's Heir and Beyond; Burning His Bridges; Whither Conservatism?; The Ideology of Western Suicide; Sectarian and Doctrinaire Clannishness; Mr. Burnham; Epilogue; Selected Bibliography.
 

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Contents

FROM LEFT TO?
1
LENINS HEIR AND BEYOND
23
BURNING HIS BRIDGES
43
WHITHER CONSERVATISM?
65
THE IDEOLOGY OF WESTERN SUICIDE
95
SECTARIAN AND DOCTRINAIRE CLANNISHNESS
117
MR BURNHAM
137
EPILOGUE
159
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
167
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