Mineral Resources of Canada: Bulletin, Issue 8

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Page 29 - NE, with a dip to the north-west at an angle of about forty degrees. In continuation of this bed for about seventy paces in either direction, the limestone was observed to hold little patches and seams of variegated ore and yellow pyrites, with stains of the blue and green carbonates of copper. The limestones in the immediate vicinity presented several veins of quartz crossing the strike, but containing only traces of copper.
Page 11 - The graphite of the Laurentian of Canada occurs both in beds and in veins, and in such a manner as to show that its origin and deposition are contemporaneous with those of the containing rock. Sir William Logan states* that 'the deposits of plumbago generally occur in the limestones or in their immediate vicinity, and granular varieties of the rock often contain large crystalline plates of plumbago. At other times this mineral is so finely disseminated as to give a bluishgray colour to the limestone,...
Page 15 - Several openings have been made on the property. In the main pit the rocks are limestone with bands of rusty gneiss which are traversed by a white granite dyke and this in turn by a dyke of light green diabase. The graphite occurs principally in two irregular veins, and also in the granite mass, and there is a small vein on the edge of the diabase. The veins are shattered and mixed with a whitish, sometimes reddish, granite.
Page 26 - ... strata, and the crystalline rocks of the Notre Dame range, supposed to be the same strata in an altered condition, were described by Logan as being arranged ' ' in long, narrow, parallel, synclinal and anticlinal forms, with many overturn-dips. The latter circumstance makes it difficult to determine which of these folds are synclinal, and which anticlinal, inasmuch as the outcrops in both cases present a similar arrangement. The weight of evidence, however, goes to show that the strata dip to...
Page 30 - The calorie used in the study of metabolism is the large calorie or kilocalorie, and is the amount of heat required to raise 1 kilogram of water from 15 to 16 C.
Page 6 - ... percentage of graphite. The occurrence of graphite has also been reported from West Bay, Grand Narrows, East Bay, and Hunters Island, and in addition, Mr. Gilpin, in his Report of the Mines of Nova Scotia 1880, mentions its presence, mostly in the form of plumbaginous shales, at Parrsborough, Salmon River, Musquodoboit, Hammonds Plains, Fifteen-mile Stream, Boularderie Island, Gregwa Brook ,and Gillis Brook, the last three being in Cape Breton. Concerning the extent of these deposits, no particulars...
Page 18 - A specimen of disseminated ore from lot 28, range VI, Buckingham, owned by the Montreal Plumbago Company, the sample being regarded as a fair average of one of the largest and most extensively worked beds in the area with a breadth of eight feet, gave by assay, graphite, 27.518; rock matter, 72.438 per cent. A sample from lot 22, range VI, Buckingham Mining Company, gave graphite 22.385, rock matter, 75.875 per cent. Specimens from lot 20, range VIII, gave graphite 23.798, rock matter, 75.026 per...
Page 15 - The granitic looking rock has somewhat the aspect of a vein in some respects rather than a true dyke. It carries several minerals including scapolite, hornblende, graphite, pyroxene, pyrite, apatite and others. South of the principal opening, where mining has been carried on, the surface rocks for some distance appear to be all limestone, and in several small prospecting pits, sunk in this rock, a small percentage of disseminated flake graphite was observed.
Page 29 - ... and with a minimum of ash (4 to 5%), at about 5200 units, or from a quarter to one-third more than that of an equal weight of wood. The lighter and more spongy varieties of peat when air-dried are exceedingly inflammable, firing at a temperature of 200 C. ; the denser pulpy kinds ignite less readily when in the natural state, and often require a still higher temperature when prepared by pulping and compression or partial carbonization. Most kinds burn with a red smoky flame, developing a very...
Page 21 - ... acres each, occur in Nepean and Goulbourn ; one of them to the east, and two to the west, of the village of Richmond. It is also found on the third and eighth ranges of...

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