The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 6

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R. Priestley, ... J. Offor, ... W.H. Reid, ... Priestley and Weale, ... M. Doyle, ... and D.A. Talboys, Oxford, 1821 - Byzantine Empire
 

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Page 304 - God, a night spent in arms, is of more avail than two months of fasting or prayer: whosoever falls in battle, his sins are forgiven: at the day of judgment his wounds shall be resplendent as vermilion, and odoriferous as musk; and the loss of his limbs shall be supplied by the wings of angels and cherubim.
Page 216 - Long life and victory to Charles, the most pious Augustus, crowned by God the great and pacific Emperor of the Romans...
Page 157 - Paul; and, in every deed of mischief, he had a heart to resolve, a head to contrive, and a hand to execute.
Page 275 - According to the tradition of his companions, Maho- Qnaiifioamet* was distinguished by the beauty of his person, an prophet, outward gift which is seldom despised, except by those to whom it has been refused. Before he spoke, the orator engaged on his side the affections of a public or private audience. They applauded his commanding presence, his majestic aspect, his piercing eye, his gracious smile, his flowing beard, his countenance that painted every sensation of the soul, and his gestures that...
Page 277 - He compares the nations and religions of the earth ; discovers the weakness of the Persian and Roman monarchies ; beholds with pity and indignation the degeneracy of the times ; and resolves to unite, under one God and one king, the invincible spirit and primitive virtues of the Arabs.
Page 470 - A victorious line of march had been prolonged above a thousand miles from the rock of Gibraltar to the banks of the Loire; the repetition of an equal space would have carried the Saracens to the confines of Poland and the Highlands of Scotland: the Rhine is not more impassable than the Nile or Euphrates, and the Arabian fleet might have sailed without a naval combat into the mouth of the Thames.
Page 357 - Persians were overcome by the belief, that the last day of their religion and empire was at hand ; the strongest posts were abandoned by treachery or cowardice ; and the king, with a part of his family and treasures, escaped to Holwan at the foot of the Median hills.
Page 279 - The Christians of the seventh century had insensibly relapsed into a semblance of paganism. Their public and private vows were addressed to the relics and images that disgraced the temples of the East, the throne of the Almighty was darkened by a cloud of martyrs, and saints, and angels, the objects of popular veneration...
Page 295 - There is but one God, and Mahomet is the apostle of God"; and their faith, even in this life, was rewarded with riches and honours, with the command of armies and the government of kingdoms.
Page 481 - A hundred lions were brought out, with a keeper to each lion. Among the other spectacles of rare and stupendous luxury was a tree of gold and silver spreading into eighteen large branches, on which, and on the lesser boughs, sat a variety of birds made of the same precious metals, as well as the leaves of the tree. While the machinery effected spontaneous motions, the several birds warbled their natural harmony.

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