The History of Sexuality: An introduction

Front Cover
Vintage Books, 1990 - Philosophy - 176 pages
Michel Foucault's 'The History of Sexuality' pioneered queer theory. In it he builds an argument grounded in a historical analysis of the word "sexuality" against the common thesis that sexuality always has been repressed in Western society. Quite the contrary: since the 17th century, there has been a fixation with sexuality creating a discourse around sexuality. It is this discourse that has created sexual minorities. In 'The History of Sexuality', Foucault attempts to disprove the thesis that Western society has seen a repression of sexuality since the 17th century and that sexuality has been unmentionable, something impossible to speak about. In the 70s, when the book was written, the sexual revolution was a fact. The ideas of the psychoanalyst Wilhelm Reich, saying that to conserve your mental health you needed to liberate your sexual energy, were popular. The past was seen as a dark age where sexuality had been something forbidden.
 

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Review: The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction (The History of Sexuality #1)

User Review  - Jed - Goodreads

A sociological/philosophical/historical book which takes aim at the generally accepted theory that Western culture as a whole has suffered from Puritannical sexual repression for the last few hundered ... Read full review

Review: The History of Sexuality 1: An Introduction (The History of Sexuality #1)

User Review  - Jana - Goodreads

First read this before all the Freud (which I'll get back to reviewing some other time) and then again a few years later and got even more out of it. My copy of this book is so marked up and tagged ... Read full review

Contents

The Incitement to Discourse
17
The Perverse Implantation
36
Objective
81
Domain
103
Index
161
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Michel Foucault was born in Poitiers, France, in 1926. He lecturerd in universities throughout the world; served as director at the Institut Francais in Hamburg, Germany and at the Institut de Philosophi at the Faculte des Lettres in the University of Clermont-Ferrand, France; and wrote frequently for French newspapers and reviews. At the time of his death in 1984, he held a chair at France's most prestigious institutions, the College de France.

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