Frames of Anime: Culture and Image-Building

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Hong Kong University Press, Apr 1, 2010 - Social Science - 256 pages
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Japanese anime has long fascinated the world, and its mythical heroes and dazzling colors increasingly influence popular culture genres in the West. Tze-yue G. Hu analyzes the “language-medium” of this remarkable expressive platform and its many socio-cultural dimensions from a distinctly Asian frame of reference, tracing its layers of concentric radiation from Japan throughout Asia. Her work, rooted in archival investigations, interviews with animators and producers in Japan as well as other Asian animation studios, and interdisciplinary research in linguistics and performance theory, shows how dialectical aspects of anime are linked to Japan’s unique experience of modernity and its cultural associations in Asia, including its reliance on low-wage outsourcing. Her study also provides English readers with insights on numerous Japanese secondary sources, as well as a number of original illustrations offered by animators and producers she interviewed.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Origins of the Japanese Art of Animating
13
2 Continuity of Art Forms and Their Visualness
25
3 Cultural Thought Expressing the Self and ImageBuilding
45
4 Development of Japanese Animation up to the End of the Second World War
59
5 Postwar Japanese Animation Development and Toei Animation Studio
77
6 Miyazaki and Takahata Anime Cinema
105
A Case of Cultural Imperialism?
137
Appendix 1
169
Appendix 2
175
Notes
179
Glossary
201
Animated Works Cited
205
Bibliography
207
Index
219
Copyright

Epilogue
165

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About the author (2010)

Tze-yue G. Hu lectures on East Asian identities and cultures and other Asian studies courses at the School of International and Area Studies, University of Oklahoma.

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