London, Past and Present: Its History, Associations, and Traditions, Volume 2

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Based upon the Handbook of London, by the late Peter Cunningham.

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Page 527 - What things have we seen Done at the Mermaid! Heard words that have been So nimble and so full of subtle flame As if that every one from whence they came Had meant to put his whole wit in a jest, And had resolved to live a fool the rest Of his dull life.
Page 89 - Enlarged winds, that curl the flood, Know no such liberty. Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage; Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage; If I have freedom in my love And in my soul am free, Angels alone, that soar above, Enjoy such liberty.
Page 470 - Lord's Day. Some of our maids sitting up late last night to get things ready against our feast to-day, Jane called us up about three in the morning, to tell us of a great fire they saw in the city.
Page 252 - Sunday in a new chariot, to provoke eyes and whispers; and then never to be seen there together again; as if we were proud of one another the first week, and ashamed of one another ever after.
Page 508 - JOHN NEWTON, CLERK, Once an infidel and libertine, A servant of slaves in Africa, Was. by the rich mercy of our Lord and Saviour, JESUS CHRIST, Preserved, restored, pardoned, And appointed to preach the faith He had long laboured to destroy, Near sixteen years at Olney, in Bucks, And . . years in this church.
Page 248 - ... some time. When he recovered he said he had a message to deliver to some women from Ford ; but he was not to tell what, or to whom. He walked out; he was followed, but somewhere about St. Paul's they lost him. He came back, and said he had delivered the message, and the women exclaimed, " Then we are all undone !
Page 39 - Near to the spot on which Snow Hill and Holborn Hill meet, there opens, upon the right hand as you come out of the city, a narrow and dismal alley leading to Saffron Hill. In its filthy shops are exposed for sale huge bunches of second-hand silk handkerchiefs of all sizes and patterns— for here reside the traders who purchase them from pickpockets.
Page 550 - Sunday shines no Sabbath-day to me: Then from the Mint walks forth the man of rhyme, Happy! to catch me, just at dinner-time.
Page 442 - This night I'll change All that is metal, in my house, to gold : And early in the morning will I send To all the plumbers and the pewterers, And buy their tin and lead up ; and to Lothbury For all the copper.
Page 226 - They will remember the singular character which belonged to that circle, in which every talent and accomplish'ment, every art and science, had its place. They will remember how the last debate was discussed in one corner, and the last comedy of Scribe in another ; while Wilkie gazed with modest admiration on Reynolds...

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