Page images
PDF
EPUB

Then we have 6 miles of power line from Longmire to Nisqually Entrance, which were constructed recently with Public Works funds. An additional sum of $1,000 will be required for winter maintenance of the new line and for repair work necessary to keep the Diesel electric-power plant at Yakima in first-class condition. The plant represents an investment of approximately $200,000.

We are asking for $5,610 for equipment. This increase, plus $3,990 in the account, will provide $9,600 for equipment.

An amount of $1,200 is proposed for the purchase of two 12-ton pick-up trucks to replace two worn out 1929 vehicles. The sum of $8,000 will provide for one 4-wheel drive, 5-ton truck with a rotary snow-plow attachment for snow-removal operations.

So that a large part of the total increase that we are asking is for winter operations. We frankly tell you that. It is $6,000 for the utility building and $8,000 for snow-removal equipment. That makes $14,000. Then there is $1,000 for a power line, which makes $15,000; and $1,200 more for additional funds for keeping the roads open.

Mr. O'NEAL. Are fees charged for skiing and that sort of thing?

Mr. DEMARAY. Yes. Fees are charged. There is enough collected from those revenues from automobiles coming up there in the wintertime to practically pay for this expense,

Mr. LAMBERTSON. It is all quite local in the wintertime, is it not?

Mr. DEMARAY. It is to a great extent local, although there is such an interest in winter sports on the Pacific coast that visitors come up there all the way from California, and from Oregon where they have this opportunity for winter sports.

Mr. O'NEAL. You think that that is practically self-supporting, do you?

Mr. DEMARAY. I believe it is; yes, sir.

Mr. Rich. In what other parks do you make any specialty of winter sports?

Mr. DEMARAY. There are two parks where we make a specialty of it; namely, Yosemite and Mount Rainier. We go to considerable expense in connection with our winter operation in those two parks.

In the other parks it is largely incidental. The roads are kept open, and it is very much more local in all other parks.

Mr. CAMMERER. These winter sports are of wonderful benefit in the way of outdoor recreational work for people all over the country. In the olden days you and I were glad to skate on a pond or on a toboggan slide. But the modern generation, especially in the past 2 years, have taken to skiing and snowshoeing.

Up in New England and in New York there are regular loads of them go out on the trains over the week end and during the week also. It has swept the country like wildfire. You can see thousands of them skiing on the hillsides. They just come there, and we have to take care of them. If you don't have comfort stations for them, for instance, they just have to go behind a tree.

Mr. ScruGHAM. "There is no question about the desirability of such a thing

[blocks in formation]

PLATT NATIONAL PARK, OKLA.

Mr. SCRUGHAM. The next item is for the Platt National Park, Okla.

Mr. DEMARAY. Our justification for that is as follows:

Platt National Park is located in southern Oklahoma, adjacent to the city of Sulphur. The mineral water produced by the springs in the park is used by thousands of people each year because of its reputed healing properties. The park was established by act approved July 1, 1902, ratifying and confirming an agreement with the Choctaw and Chickasaw Indian tribes to cede certain lands to the United States. The area of the park is 818.31 acres.

The estimate of $20,600 for 1938 is the same as the total appropriation for 1937.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK, COLO. Mr. SCRUGHAM. The next item is Rocky Mountain National Park, Colo.

Mr. DEMARAY. Our justification for that is as follows:

Rocky Mountain National Park is located in northwestern Colorado, 70 miles northwest of Denver. It straddles the Continental Divide, and contains the most rugged and representative scenic portion of the Front Range in Colorado. The road across the Continental Divide reaches an elevation of 12,183 feet and is the highest automobile road in the National Park system. The park was established by act approved January 26, 1915, as amended, and comprises an area of 259,411 acres.

The estimate of $82,000 for 1938 is the same as the total appropriation for 1937.

SEQUOIA NATIONAL PARK, CALIF.
Mr. SCRUGHAM. The next item is the Sequoia National Park.

Mr. DEM ARAY. I submit the following justification:
Amount included in Budget, fiscal year 1938.

$104, 100 Appropriation, fiscal year 1937

99, 300

Net increase, 1938 over 1937

4, 660) The net increase of $4,600 is recommended to provide as follows:

Administration and protection; increase, $1.320.--The recommended increase is to provide for the employment of a timekeeper and an assistant purchasing and voucher clerk for a period of 6 months each. Park operations expand considerably during the summer season and administrative work lags and permanent personnel must work considerable overtime to handle even the most urgent matters.

Maintenance, repair, and operation; increase, $2,030.- The additional sum of $910 is required for the maintenance of 13 miles of the Generals' Highwas between the western boundary of Sequoia National Park and the southern boundary of General Grant National Park which has been designated as an approach road and will be turned over from the Bureau of Public Roads during 1937. An increase of $100 is recommended to provide for maintenance of extensions to the electric and water systems, constructed with emergency funds. The additional sum of $720 is recommended for the employment of a mechanic for 6 months to assist in the repair of machinery and equipment which are lised more extensively as a result of rapidly growing winter activities in the park.

Equipment; increase, $1,250.The sun of $1,750 is recommended for the pur. chase of equipment, an increase of $1,250 over the 1937 allotment of $3.57 Of this amount, $750 is included for the replacement of a car purchased in 1924 and which has no turn-in value. The balance of $4.000 will be used for the purchase or replacement of tents, ranges, steel cots, mattresses, office equipment. electric refrigerators, and other miscellaneous small tools and equipment, and for the purchase of 34-ton pick-up trucks to replace similar vehicles purchased in 1928 and 1929, now in poor condition.

Mr. SCRUGHAM. What is the explanation of this increase of $4,600 ?

Mr. DEMARAY. $1,320 of that is for the employment of a timekeeper and an assistant purchasing and voucher clerk for a period of 6 months each; $2,030 is for maintenance, repair, and operation.

We are asking an additional sum of $910 for the maintenance of 13 miles of the Generals' Highway between the western boundary of Sequoia National Park and the southern boundary of General Grant National Park, which has been designated as an approach road and will be turned over by the Bureau of Public Roads during 1937; $400 is for the maintenance of extensions to the electric and water systems.

In other words, most of this $4,600 increase is due to increased facilities which need maintenance, or it is due to increase in travel. Of course, the extension of the facilities is due to the same cause.

The other item is $1,250 for equipment. The travel there in Sequoia Park in 1935 was 205,783, and in 1936 was 230,714.

SHENANDOAH NATIONAL PARK, VA,

Mr. SCRUGHAM. The next item is for the Shenandoah National Park, Va.

Mr. DEMARAY. I submit the following justification : Amount included in Budget, fiscal year 1938_

$58, 000 Appropriation, fiscal year 1937--

39, 800

Net increase 1938 over 1937---

18, 200 The net increase of $18,200 is recommended to provide as follows:

Administration and protection; incrcase, $11,120.-With this area assuming full park status, development and increased use of its facilities result in increased administrative work. An increase of $1,640 is recommended to establish a permanent position of junior clerk at $1,440 per annum, and for additional office supplies, and heat, light, and power. An increased amount of $9,780 is essential for the employment of four additional permanent rangers, for additional temporary ranger service, and for ranger supplies, such as gasoline, oil, first-aid supplies, etc. The additional ranger service is necessary to provide adequately for the care and protection of visitors and park property, including the patrolling of new sections of the Skyline Drive, and for duty at entrance stations for the collection of fees.

Maintenance, repair, and operation; increase, $3,720.-The additional sum of $400 is recommended for maintenance of buildings at the Rapidan Camp. An increase of $2,000 is required for the maintenance and repair of additional roads, including new sections of the Skyline Drive. An additional sum of $470 is necessary for maintenance of new electric, telephone, and water systems constructed with Public Works funds. The sum of $800 is recommended for the employment of a permanent mechanic in connection with the repair of trucks, machinery, and equipment. A saving in temporary services, together with the increase recommended, will be sufficient for the salary of this employee. An increase of $50 is necessary for repairs to two additional passenger vehicles proposed for purchase in 1938.

Equipment; increase, $3,060.—This increase, plus $5,540 in the account, will provide $8,60 for the purchase of equipment. The sum of $1,100 is proposed for the purchase of a passenger car and motorcycle necessary because of expanded activities in the par.

The purchase of a 2162-ton dump truck, a tractor, a motor grader, and small tools and equipment will require the sum of $7.500.

Mr. SCRUGHAM. What is this increase of $18.200 for? Mr. DEMARAY. This is the type of park where we do have in-andout in 1 day and week-end travel, because it is so close to Washington.

In 1935 there was no record of the travel, but in 1936 there were 694,095 people counted in this park.

The principal increase is for administration and protection. Last year we were just getting the park organized. This year we are asking for the necessary personnel to take care of it.

We are asking for four additional permanent rangers. They are going to be necessary in order to collect these additional fees. There has been no fee to date; and, with the fee, when it is approved, it will be necessary to have the personnel for its collection.

Maintenance and operation is an increase of $3,720. Then there is an increase of $3,061) for the support of equipment. We have not had a great deal of equipment there up to the present time.

Mr. Rich. What do you mean? It has not been approved yet!

Mr. DEMARAY. The fee for the Shenandoah Park has not been approved. That is what we were reading this morning, about the recommendations that had been made.

Mr. Rich. Who has to approve that? Is that the Secretary of the Interior?

Mr. DEMARAY. The Secretary of the Interior.

Mr. SORUGHAM. Does any higher authority, such as the President, pass on such matters!

Mr. DE LARAY. No, sir. But this morning it was said that the suggestion for increased fees came from the Budget, so presumably it was suggested by higher authority.

WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, S. DAK.
Mr. SOREGIAM. The next item is for Wind (ave National Park,
S. Dak.

Mr. DEMARAY. The justification for that item is as follows:
The net increase of $2,620 is recommended to provide as follows:

Administration and protection; one rease', $1.730 -An increase of $1,50 is recommended to provide for the employment of a permanent ranger to protect and care for the buffalo, elk, deer, and antelope herds, transferred from the l'nited States Biological Surves on July 1, 1835. An increase of $130 is reummended for travel exp****** ****ary for supervision, protection, and emer gency actisite in nearby areas.

Maintenante, repair, and operation: iminearr, 8**0 - The sum of $300 will be required for the purchase of snit and hay for the buffalo, elk, deer, and ante lope herds mentioned under adminitration and protection. An additional stan of $130 is includes to provide for the operation of 2 new employer's' resideners constructed with Pullte Works funds. An increase of $150 will be required for 6 months' maintenance of i mlip of oil mit gravel road to be turned over from the Bureau of Public Read on December 31, 19?7 An additional sum of $80 is required for repairs to the care elevator, and is recommended for repairs to the 1.100 feet of tile pu* pwer line. . funds have been allotted for the latter work in the past An increase of $150 I pommended to pro 11de frut the maintenance of the water systein and for repairs to trucks and Boxer vehicles,

TELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, WYO). Mr. SORUGHAM. We will now take up Yellou-tone National Park.

Mr. DEMARAY. I wish to submit the following justification : Amount included in Budget fwal year 1972

$111.00 Appropriation, fiscal year 11637 Net Inrease, IKS ofer 1837

12. 130

The net increase of $19,730, plus $8,800 representing a decrease in the equipment account from $22,800 to $14,000, provides $28,350 additional for other acrvunts, as follows:

Administration and protection; increase, $5,671.- This increase is recomtended to provide for the services of additional temporary employees, and incidental expenses, due to the large increase in the number of visitors, and expanded activities resulting from emergency programs in the area. Of this amount, the sum of $825 is required for additional temporary clerical services; $1.500 for a portion of the salaries of a janitor and warehouseman ; $406 for a temporary ranger-naturalist for 3 months; $2,060 for five temporary rangers; and $880 for heating an auxiliary administration building, travel expenses, subsistence, printing, and rents.

Maintenance, repair, and operation; increase, $22,879.—The construction of apartment quarters at Mammoth at a cost of $137,000 and four ranger stations and additions, with Public Works funds, and the construction of museums with funds donated by the Rockefeller Foundation, have entailed considerable addifional maintenance and repair work. An increase of $1.009 is recommended to provide the care of these new structures and for the proper reconditioning of the old buildings. Approximately 24 of the larger buildings have not been painted for 8 years, and, unless sufficient funds are provided for the work, they will deteriorate to such as extent that their stability will be threatened.

The great increase in the number of motor vehicles entering the park and the present demand for high-standard highways necessitates the recommendation for an additional $4,210 to provide more extensive road maintenance. An increase of $419 is included for the maintenance of 241 miles of additional trails, scheduled for completion with emergency funds.

By the 1938 fiscal year it will have been practically 5 years since any real ronstruction maintenance has been accomplished on the telephone system, one of the most essential items in the administration of the park. An increase of 2.39 is urgently recommended for this purpose and to provide employment of two permanent telephone operators in lieu of the present temporary services ailable to operate the switchboard at Mammoth. The maintenance and

ir of the new power plant constructed with Public Works funds at a cost starly $200.000 will require an increase of $750.

An increased sum of $1,000 is included for the maintenance of the sewer and water systems. The mileage of the sewer system has been more than doubled he construction work under emergency programs, and 13 new water systems afe been installed during the past 6 years without the allotment of additional inds for maintenance and repairs. The sum of $1,500 is needed for additional sanitation work to provide adequately for the greatly increased number of Tisitors and for the maintenance of considerable extensions to the campground areas, accomplished with emergency funds. Due to curtailed allotments in the past, the game situation in Yellowstone has become acute, and an increase of $11) is essential to maintain five hay ranches to supplement the heavily overzrazed winter ranges and to seed and protect the winter ranges.

An increase of $3,5500 is recommended for the operation of the new apartmenit house constructed for employees with Public Works funds at a cost of $137.6200.

Mr. SORUGILAN. You have an increase here of $19,750. That is a *unt increase of more than $19.000, is it not?

Mr. DEMARAY. It is a net increase of $19.750.

Mr. SORUGHAM. Is that a recurring item? It seems to me that I have heard of that before.

Mr. DEMARAY. This item represents the largest park that we have. The travel the year before last was 317,998. Last year it was 432,570.

What that travel did to the park last year was this: It simply tamped the sanitary and water facilities in most of the camp stounds. This program is for maintenance, repair, and operation.

The gross increase is $22,870. There is a decrease in some other item accounting for the difference there. It is to maintain and operate our roads and our water and sanitary systems.

« PreviousContinue »