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Nothing has been done relative to the protection or establishment of water in this district other than to see that the lands which are now under cultia receive the water which they need for irrigation. Homesteaders located , and in some cases intermingled with, the irrigable allotments are at the at time using the entire low-water flow of the creeks, leaving no water availor the additional development of these lands. It is proposed, therefore, to lish the Indian water rights as of the date of establishment of the reservation, least as of the date of the setting aside of the irrigable allotments which would 05. The latter date would be sufficient as no homesteads were taken up in istrict until 1911.

This project contemplates the construction of 40 miles of canal with capacrarying from 10 cubic feet per second to 4 cubic feet per second to irrigate ximately 2,500 acres. This work could be done entirely with an Indian

with the exception of one foreman to supervise the work. The ditching is remely easy and very few small structures are required so that the money ould be practically all spent for labor and team hire.

(c) The project contemplates the construction of 13 miles of ditch with a 4 cubic feet per second capacity to irrigate 600 acres of Indian lands in four allotments. This project is entirely similar to project (6).

(d) This contemplates the rehabilitation of present irrigation ditches constructed by the Indians themselves.

(e) It is proposed to clear the sage brush and level the land ready for cultivation on the 3,100 acres to be covered by the development of proposed items (6) and (c).

o Under this item it is contemplated making a complete survey and investigation into the cost and feasibility of watering approximately 8,000 acres of irrigable land under the White River. There is no question relative to the water supply as during the last year, which is the shortest water supply year of history, the minimum flow of White River was 75 second-feet.

(9) There are two small isolated allotments on Sweet Water Creek and four on the upper end of White River. Under this item, it is proposed to install small pumping units for the irrigation of these tracts.

COLVILLE RESERVATION IRRIGATION PROJECT
Mr. O'NEAL. The next item is the "Colville project, $15,000."
Mr. Dond. The justification for this item is as follows:

The Colville Reservation in Okanogan and Ferry Counties, Wash., contains an area of 526,227 acres with an Indian population of 3,118. The irrigable area of some 6,000 acres is scattered over the reservation in 3 separate units-Nespelem, San Poil, and Hall Creek.

The construction cost to June 30, 1936, was $195,019.01 and the operation and maintenance cost $84,538.04.

The Hall Creek unit, located near Inchelium and comprising the Stranger Creek and Hall Creek areas, is the least developed of these units in proportion to irrigation possibilities. Although this unit has an adequate water supply, if properly developed, the distribution facilities are entirely inadequate. With an irrigable area of approximately 3,800 acres only about 300 acres are under constructed works. With an allotment of $25,000 from the Public Works Administration this system is now being extended by enlarging the main canals and by additional lateral construction. An additional amount of $15,000 is necessary to complete the canal system and to provide for additional water either by connecting the Hall Creek unit with the Twin Lakes Reservoir or by developing additional water at the La Fleur Meadow site on Hall Creek.

Suitable farming land on this reservation is very limited and as farming is practically the only means these Indians have of becoming self-supporting, it is of urgent importance that irrigation facilities be provided as quickly as possible, particularly in connection with the livestock industry. Cattle raising should prove highly successful in the Incheliun Valley provided winter feed can be produced at a reasonable cost. With a dependable average annual water supply of about 7,000 acre-feet, derived from Twin Lakes Storage Reservoir in addition to water developed on Hall Creek, and with an adequate distributary system which will be inexpensive to operate and maintain, it is believed that completion of the Hall Creek irrigation system will furnish the assistance most needed to assure success of the industry to which these Indians must look for their main support. NAVAJO IRRIGATION PROJECT, UTAH

Mr. O'NEAL. The next item is for the Navajos in L'tah, $10,000. Mr. DODD. The justification in support of this item is as follows:

There are two units involved. Montezuma Creek project is located on Monte zuma Creek, approximately 30 miles east of Bluff City, ('tah.

The water supply is to be diverted from Montezuma Creek, an ephemeral stream. The irrigable area which is limited to the water supply is estimated to be approximately 200 acres. By direct diversion and dry farming, a few Indusz are at the present time cultivating several small patches along this creek. The principal crops which can be produced are, corn, alfalfa, beans, and inelons

It is proposed to construct a small reinforced concrete diversion dam and a di tributary system, complete with structures. When this project is completed its estimated that at least 30 Indian families can sustain themselves through an cultural pursuits. At least, a like number of Indians residing within the inity of the project will be indirectly benefited by trading with the Indians living on the project. Estimated cost:

Diversion dam...
Distributary system...

Total The other project is located near Oljeto Store, L'tah, which is approximately 30 miles porth of Kayenta, Ariz.

The water supply for this project is to be diverted from an ephemeral stream and springs which flow from under the banks of the stream. The irrigable area is approximately 200 acres, none of which is cultivated at the present time. The soil is a sandy loam and the principal crops which may be raised are corn, MA beans, melons, and some garden truck.

It is proposed to construct a small concrete diversion dam across the wash. It is estimated that at least 30 families may be painfully employed on this land us producing profitable crops. Other Indians raising flocks in the vicinity will also be benefited by trading meat for farm products.

Mr. O'NEAL. That is purely an Indian project?

Mr. WATHEN. Yes, sir. The money will not be reimbursable so long as the land remains in Indian ownership.

Mr. O'NEAL. Is that the total amount that will be required?
Mr. Wathen. The $10,000 will complete the Navajo project.

INCOMPARGRE PROJECT

Mr. O'NEAL. The next item is the "l'ncompahgre project, $10,000 * Mr. DODD. The justification in support of this item is as follows:

The construction program for this division of the former Cintah Indian Reser vation ountemplates the following work: (a) Adjudication surveys .. bi Construction Willow Creek irrigation system, 40 miles, for 2,500 serde. ( Irrigation system, 13 miles, for 600 acres --(d) Improvement Bitter Creek irrigation system. le Land subjugation, 3,100 acres, Hill and Willow Creeks.

White River investigation, 8,000 acres a) Irrigation system t'pper Sweetwater and White River allotments 500

acres............***

Total..... The current appropriation act provides $10,000 to start this program. It plar 1 to p r'ite the balance of the work over a period of several y

The Indians are desiruum of having this work done as the arras to be deurged are in the center of a good gu district. If it is possible for them to n . little winter feed, the Indians can increase their present cattle and sheep bers very materially, thus giving them a chance to make an independent living

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10 000 (a) Nothing has been done relative to the protection or establishment of water rights in this district other than to see that the lands which are now under cultivation receive the water which they need for irrigation Homesteaders located above, and in some cases intermingled with, the irrigable allotments are at the present time using the entire low-water flow of the creeks, leaving no water available for the additional development of these lands. It is proposed, therefore, to establish the Indian water rights as of the date of establishment of the reservation, or at least as of the date of the setting aside of the irrigable allotments which would be 1905. The latter date would be sufficient as no homesteads were taken up in this district until 1911.

(b) This project contemplates the construction of 40 miles of canal with capacities varying from 10 cubic feet per second to 4 cubic feet per second to irrigate approximately 2,500 acres. This work could be done entirely with an Indian crew with the exception of one foreman to supervise the work. The ditching is extremely easy and very few small structures are required so that the money would be practically all spent for labor and team hire.

(c) The project contemplates the construction of 13 miles of ditch with a 4 cubic feet per second capacity to irrigate 600 acres of Indian lands in four allotments. This project is entirely similar to project (6).

(d) This contemplates the rehabilitation of present irrigation ditches constructed by the Indians themselves.

(e) It is proposed to clear the sage brush and level the land ready for cultivation on the 3,100 acres to be covered by the development of proposed items (6) and (c).

o Under this item it is contemplated making a complete survey and investigation into the cost and feasibility of watering approximately 8,000 acres of irrigable land under the White River. There is no question relative to the water supply as during the last year, which is the shortest water supply year of history, the minimum flow of White River was 75 second-feet.

(0) There are two small isolated allotments on Sweet Water Creek and four on the upper end of White River. Under this item, it is proposed to install small pumping units for the irrigation of these tracts.

COLVILLE RESERVATION IRRIGATION PROJECT
Mr. O'NEAL. The next item is the “Colville project, $15,000."
Mr. Dond. The justification for this item is as follows:

The Colville Reservation in Okanogan and Ferry Counties, Wash., contains an area of 526,227 acres with an Indian population of 3,118. The irrigable area of some 6,000 acres is scattered over the reservation in 3 separate units-Nespelem, San Poil, and Hall Creek

The construction cost to June 30, 1936, was $195,019.01 and the operation and maintenance cost $84,538.04.

The Hall Creek unit, located near Inchelium and comprising the Stranger Creek and Hall Creek areas, is the least developed of these units in proportion to irrigation possibilities. Although this unit has an adequate water supply, if properly developed, the distribution facilities are entirely inadequate. With an irrigable area of approximately 3,800 acres only about 300 acres are under constructed works. With an allotment of $25,000 from the Public Works Administration this system is now being extended by enlarging the main canals and by additional lateral construction. An additional amount of $15,000 is necessary to complete the canal system and to provide for additional water either by connecting the Hall Creek unit with the Twin Lakes Reservoir or by developing additional water at the La Fleur Meadow site on Hall Creek.

Suitable farming land on this reservation is very limited and as farming is practically the only means these Indians have of becoming self-supporting, it is of urgent importance that irrigation facilities be provided as quickly as possible, particularly in connection with the livestock industry. Cattle raising should prove highly successful in the Incheliun Valley provided winter feed can be produced at a reasonable cost. With a dependable average annual water supply of about 7,000 acre-feet, derived from Twin Lakes Storage Reservoir in addition to water developed on Hall Creek, and with an adequate distributary system which will be inexpensive to operate and maintain, it is believed that completion of the Hall Creek irrigation system will furnish the assistance most needed to assure success of the industry to which these Indians must look for their main support.

WAPATO PROJECT Mr. O'NEAL. The next item is the “Wapato project,"for which you are requesting $35,000.

Mr. Dodd. We offer the following justification in support of this item:

The Wapato project includes 145,445 acres of irrigable land of which 120,000 acres are under completed canals. The cost of construction to June 30, 1936, was $5,976,297.18. The estimated cost to complete the project as of June 30, 1935, was $1,400,000. A Public Works Administration allotment of $300,000 was made available for the fiscal years 1936 and 1937, which on June 30, 1937, will leave an estimated cost of $1,100,000 to complete. The following tabulation shows the items which make up the estimated cost of $1,400,000, the expenditures for 1936 and 1937, the estimate for 1938 and the balance to complete thereafter:

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Main-drain enlargement, $7,500.-It is estimated that the main-drain enlargement will be done by contract and will not be completed until June 30, 1938. Twelve highway bridges are to be built across this drain. These bridges will not be included in the contract for the excavation of the drain but will be built by force account. It is estimated that the contractor will have completed one-half of the drain by the end of the fiscal year 1937 and that six of the bridges will have been built, leaving six bridges to be built later. The cost of these bridges is estimated at $1,250 each.

Subdrains, $52,500.-The original estimate for this item was $125,000, which has been increased $24,000, due principally to the necessity for installing larger culverts than were originally planned and to the difficulty of digging under water during the summertime. The completion of the drainage works is important as the construction of drainage canals has lagged behind the construction of irrigation facilities. The result is a large area of project land within which the ground water plane is so close to the surface as seriously to reduce the productivity of the land. This condition is further complicated by the fact that the high groundwater plane causes a concentration of alkali on the ground surface. This concentration increases yearly so that the longer the land is without adequate drainage the more difficult it will be to reclaim it when drainage is provided.

Metal turnout gates with measuring devices, $90,000. These gates are to replace timber gates which are expensive to maintain and which include no means for measuring the flow of water. The metal gates proposed are equipped with measuring devices which make it possible to measure the flow of water through them as accurately as it can be measured over a weir. At most of the delivery points on the project there is not sufficient head to permit the use of weirs for measuring the flow. At these points the calibrated gates offer the only practical means of measurement; 183 of these gates, installed in March 1936, have been found to be very efficient. The original estimate for the cost of installing 2.000 of these gates was $120,000. The labor required was found to be less than was estimated and in some of the smaller ditches a shorter outlet pipe can be used making an estimated saving of $19,000 in the total cost of gate installation.

Ertension and enlargement of laterals, $35,000.-This includes the extension of Totorals in various parts of the project to lands not heretofore served, the replacewont of timber division boxes on pump unit no. 1 which are now badly decayed,

rete boxes similar to those on pump unit no. 2, and the enlargement of

which have insufficient capacity. This is the only feature of the total program provided for in the 1938 budget.

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